Huge thank you to @the_glam_nurse at @healthfinity for this amazingggg #VampireFacial today!!💉💀😈 After numbing your face, your blood is drawn & spun down into a gel-like plasma that's injected into the skin with a micropen. This stimulates collagen production to increase facial volume while diminishing pores, fine lines & wrinkles for an overall youthful radiance! Safe to say I'm obsessed already😍 Use me as a referral for a discount on all your skincare needs!! @healthfinity @healthfinity @healthfinity #PreventativeSkinCare #PRP #PlateletRichPlasma
Ever heard of the Platelet-Rich Plasma Facial? If not, maybe you’ve heard of its more Instagrammable moniker “The Vampire Facial.” And we know, we’re STDcheck, so you might be thinking this has to do with Twilight and erotic fan fiction, but it doesn’t. This treatment first came to public light in 2013 when Kim K famously posted a bloody selfie after undergoing the procedure. Since then, celebrities, bloggers, and civilians alike have praised the good name of the Vampire Facial, citing it as the source of their dewy skin and radiant complexion. But recently, the publicity surrounding this mythologically-named derma treatment has turned negative after a spa in Albuquerque, New Mexico urged its Vampire Facial patrons to get tested for HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C.
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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