The good thing about vampire facelift is that it avoids one of the major side effect of facial filler, which is allergic reactions to animal or synthetic components. As mentioned above, due to the fact that the mixture of the selphyl compound is mostly from the patients blood samples, it reduces the probability of such allergy related side effects. In fact, this benefit is one of the reason for vampire face-lift is so popular right now.

The key ingredient for the Vampire Facelift® is the platelet-rich fibrin matrix, which is derived from the patient’s own blood before being mixed with other factors. These properties make platelet-rich fibrin matrix an ideal natural serum for rejuvenating facial skin quality, as it increases collagen production, increases blood supply, and triggers new skin and fatty tissue generation, thus creating the youthful appearance that comes with generating new, healthier skin in a safe and natural way.
Runels is very serious about protecting the vampire name, emphasizing that he defined and named the procedure and does not want people being confused. He goes to great lengths to prevent "Vampire Facelift" from become a generic term for any procedure that uses PRP and makes it clear the procedure is not for everyone, including patients on blood thinners.

A "blood facial" or "vampire facial" is a cosmetic procedure during which a doctor draws a couple vials of blood from your arm, centrifuges the blood to separate out the plasma and platelets from the red blood cells, and then adds the platelet-rich plasma back into your face. For extra absorption, the doctor pokes your face all over with a bunch of micro-needles before applying the plasma. Reminds me a little bit of making a Jell-O poke cake.


The Vampire FactLift™ procedure lasts about 30 minutes.  Blood is drawn from the patient’s arm.  The blood is placed in a centrifuge where it is processed to isolate the platelets from the red blood cells and other blood components.  The blood is then treated, most commonly with calcium chloride.  This process releases the PRFM (platelet rich fibrin matrix), growth-rich platelets.
An Albuquerque, New Mexico, spa was served with a cease-and-desist letter and was forced to close this month because it may have exposed a client to an infection. The culprit? “Vampire facials,” a trendy skin care treatment that involves drawing blood from a client’s body, placing it in a centrifuge, then reapplying it to the face, supposedly to promote cell renewal.
Once the microneedling was in full swing I was surprised at how little it actually hurt. I’m not going to say it was painless, but it wasn’t nearly as bad as I had imagined. It helped that throughout the 30-minute procedure Rhiannon made sure to check with me to see if I was in too much pain or needed a break. She also told me exactly what she was doing so there were no surprises and kindly warned me when it was time to needle my non-fatty areas because those are the spots that made me flinch.

As far as risks go, there aren't as many as you might think. In fact, Shamban explained that the only risk you really run is bruising at the time of the venipuncture. Aside from the discomfort of a blood draw and bruising from injection or microneedling, Zeichner says the vampire facial is "extremely safe, as it is your body's own blood being recycled."
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