This injection of PRP into the face activates multipotent stem cells and tricks the body into generating new tissue, as it would after an injury. The patient’s system will naturally grow collagen for moisture and a more youthful face, new fatty tissue for smoothness and new blood vessels for a glowing complexion. The procedure was inspired by how your body heals after an injury.
Another thing you should be prepared for? The way to care for your skin post-treatment. Dr. Peredo advised that since vampire facials drive tiny needles into your skin, creating pathways for PRP to dive deep into your pores for truly transformative results, you want to stay away from anything else that could seep into that sacred space and irritate it. Think: makeup and skin-care acids. Don’t worry though, living in the no-makeup world that we live in, no one will bat an eye, and you’ll be able to return to your favorite cosmetics in two short days. With acids, on the other hand, it’s best to wait a full week. Simple enough. 
The procedure has been around for several years, but became more widely available after Kim Kardashian posted a blood-slathered selfie on Instagram in 2013, after filming the procedure for an episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians spin-off Kourtney & Kim Take Miami. Earlier this year, Kardashian reflected on the experience in a post on her blog; the text is only available to paid subscribers, but honestly, the bloody photo, headline (“The Skincare Treatment I’ll Never Do Again”) and caption (“So Not Worth It!”) – not to mention the mysterious infection in Albuquerque – just about sums it up.
Restylane® may be added to a Vampire Face Lift for $499 per syringe if needed. (Must be injected at the same time) Additional treatments may be desirable if Restylane® is not injected. *All Prices Subject to Change Specials for a limited time only, are not valid on prior purchases, cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. No refunds or exchanges. Certain restrictions may apply.
The Vampire Facial® procedure, using a specific technique for micro-needing, followed by application of PRP. The Vampire Facelift® procedure involves using Juvederm to restore shape followed by injecting PRP below the dermis the help restore color and texture along with enhancing a normal shape.  The Vampire Facial® procedure is described in more detail here.

While your face will look red, swollen and bloody immediately after the treatment (it can last a few hours to up to three days after), the results (you’ll see glowing skin immediately but it can take a month or so for the full results, which last about three months, to surface) it provides for cellular rejuvenation are unparalleled because it shortens healing time and stimulates collagen. “Athletes have used it to heal sprains, and now dermatologists are using the technique for hair restoration,” says Dr. Cheung.


"It's one of the most popular treatments at my practice," says Gary Goldenberg, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. "We use it to treat acne, acne scarring, melasma, surgical scars, and fine wrinkles and lines." (PRP can also be used on your scalp to treat hair loss because it can stimulate hair growth.)
The facialist can reintroduce this PRP serum into the client's skin in two ways: by direct injection or microneedling. (Many treatments include both methods.) A vibrating microneedling pen opens tiny holes in the skin so that once the plasma is smeared on the face, it penetrates deeply. To minimize discomfort, Dr. Arviv's team preps the client's skin for microneedling with a numbing cream.

"[It's] a broad term that was originally coined by a provider in Southern California—it doesn’t really describe a specific treatment," Wilbur Hah from the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery told Newsweek. "Generally speaking, the term “vampire facial” is used to describe platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy, with most physicians performing a microneedling treatment with PRP to both trigger the body’s natural healing response and provide the skin with regenerative growth factors."


First and foremost, Kim, as much as we love her (or hate to love her, or whatever), is dramatic AF. At no point during the treatment was I compelled to whimper and cry in pain. Sure, there were moments—most notably, when the Dermapen grazed over the area of my forehead just above my brows leading up to my hairline—where it felt like I was being scalped, but since it was so brief, my pain receptors didn’t even have the chance to trigger tears—or, more surprisingly, blood. 

Runels is very serious about protecting the vampire name, emphasizing that he defined and named the procedure and does not want people being confused. He goes to great lengths to prevent "Vampire Facelift" from become a generic term for any procedure that uses PRP and makes it clear the procedure is not for everyone, including patients on blood thinners.
Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers (like Juvederm and Restylane) lift the skin away from the bone to restore youthful volume and shape. But HA fillers can cause problems near the eye. Also, the injector of HA fillers can chase a wrinkle and create a shape that looks foreign to the person's face or even foreign to this planet. The HA fillers do little to improve skin tone and texture.
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