A vampire facial is a type of facial treatment that rejuvenates the face using via PRP, or platelet-rich plasma—a serum made from the client's own blood. Vials of withdrawn blood are spun in a centrifuge until it separates, isolating the red and white blood cells from the plasma, an amber serum rich in platelets. "If it's a little hazy, you might have some other stuff floating around [in it], and you can spin it again to maximize your serum," Dr. Arviv said.
The Vampire Facelift procedure only takes about an hour to complete, and that includes the: blood draw, preparation of the PRP, platelet-rich fibrin matrix, and The Vampire Facelift® treatment itself. Since skin renewal and rejuvenation is using the body’s own active regeneration components, facial skin renewal is continual for about 3 months after the procedure. The overall effects of the Vampire Facelift® can last for over a year.
Your best bet is to schedule a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has experience with all facial rejuvenation techniques and technologies. Due to the large number of doctors promoting themselves as qualified cosmetic surgeons, choosing a surgeon can be a challenge. To make this task easier, Consumer Guide to Plastic Surgery has created a directory that exclusively lists surgeons who are board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS). Certification by the ABPS is widely accepted as the highest level of certification possible for plastic surgeons in the United States. Choosing one of these doctors guarantees you will be treated by a surgeon who has undergone extensive education, training and testing and is in excellent standing among his or her peers in the medical field.
The day leading up to my appointment, my best friend continually cringed at the idea of my soon-to-be bloody face while my mom made sure to text me every five minutes asking if this is really something I wanted to go through with, having sensitive skin and all. While their concerns pushed me to the point of advising my editor that I may need to work from home the next day if I look busted AF (since bruising and redness are possible short-term results), I stuck to my appointment and headed to the Upper East Side to arrive early for a treatment that, at the very best, could change the way I view my complexion, and, at the very worst, put me out of commission for a couple of days. 
I was intrigued after delving into some research on the PRP (platelet-rich plasma) Growth Factor Facial. I actually started to come around to the idea of having tiny needles continuously plunged into my plasma-covered face. You see, the bloody facial featured on Keeping Up with the Kardashians is actually called the “Vampire Facelift™”. It is a trademarked procedure that is different from the one I would be receiving. The Kardashian-endorsed version involves filler injections. I was relieved to learn that Dr.Lorenc’s did not. A little Botox here and there is one thing, but a face full of fillers is another.
Rupture of a silicone-filled breast implant is most often silent and may not be detected by you or your doctor. You should have an MRI 3 years after your surgery and then every 2 years after that for as long as you have your breast implants to determine if rupture is present. If implant rupture is noted on an MRI, you should have the implant removed, with or without replacement.
At Reflections, we know that you want to make smart investments that your future self will thank you for. That’s one of the biggest appeals of a Vampire Facelift – not only will you see results that last longer than having any one of these procedures on their own, but upkeep will be minimal, and for the results you’ll see, this is one of the most cost-effective treatment options.
Dr. Peredo explained that a vampire facial, also known as a blood facial or PRP facial, involves extracting blood from a patient’s arm and using a centrifuge to separate the platelets and plasma from the red blood cells. From there, Dermapen, microneedling, infuses skin with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that stimulates collagen and elastin fibers to promote cell turnover for your most brilliant complexion through a series of thousands of tiny pinpricks. Okay, so no wonder Kim looked terribly in pain. But anything in the name of beauty, right?

While your face will look red, swollen and bloody immediately after the treatment (it can last a few hours to up to three days after), the results (you’ll see glowing skin immediately but it can take a month or so for the full results, which last about three months, to surface) it provides for cellular rejuvenation are unparalleled because it shortens healing time and stimulates collagen. “Athletes have used it to heal sprains, and now dermatologists are using the technique for hair restoration,” says Dr. Cheung.
The New Mexico Department of Health announced this week that that a client of VIP Spa developed an undisclosed infection that may have come from having a vampire facial treatment done at the spa. The organization is urging people who got any "injection related service, including a vampire facial," to get tested for hepatitis B and C along with HIV. (The clinic has been shut down, BTW.)
Platelet rich plasma is a pretty new procedure which uses your own blood to improve skin quality. If you are looking for more volume and fillings I think you are better of having a liquid facelift or even a laser facelift treatment. I found it to be effective in skin texture and skin tone so it really depends on what results you are hoping for. Combining good skincare post treatment is a good way to maintain your skin and the prp results will also last longer.
Platelets, Zeichner explains, are rich in growth factors, which essentially act as energy boots for our skin. This helps our skin function optimally, increasing everything from collagen to elastin, while also bringing antioxidant and hydrating properties. "Platelet-rich plasma is now commonly used topically as part of a regular facial, used along with microneedling to enhance penetration into the skin, and is even being injected into the skin in the same manner as dermal fillers," says Zeichner.
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