When I’m conducting my aesthetic PRP training in Beverly Hills & Nashville for doctors and clinic staff on how to perform PRP aesthetic procedures in the office or discussing the procedures with patients, one of the most frequent questions I hear is: “What’s the difference between the Vampire Facelift and the Vampire Facial?” They certainly sound similar, so the confusion isn’t surprising. Even though both of these trademarked procedures utilize PRP (platelet rich plasma), there is actually a significant difference in how they are completed and the results they provide.


The same process is used in the Vampire Facial. The patient’s own blood is drawn, treated, and then the platelet-rich plasma is injected into the patient’s face. Injections are made into strategic areas to encourage skin healing and renewal through new collagen production and fresh skin cells full of human growth factors. This increase in collagen and growth factors creates a more youthful, plumper, and firmer appearing skin.

A facelift is a surgical procedure to reposition sagging cheeks and skin to improve the face, jawline and neck. Many people are hesitant to have surgery because of the risks of anesthesia and the healing process. Dr Prasad developed the Quick Recovery Facelift performed under local anesthesia with minimal intravenous sedation which allows patients to recover faster than a typical facelift performed under general anesthesia.
The ’prp therapy’ or the platelet rich plasma therapy,worked wonders for me and my best friend. Since we were both a little scarred to go for it alone, we decide to visit a dermatology clinic together. It kind of sounded more scary than it actually was when we did it. And after that we both went for coffee, like it wasn’t a big deal at all. We tan a lot, and we were both experiencing dry skin, and some sun damage, although we do really care for our skin. The treatment lasted for 45 minutes in my case, and my friend was in there for an hour. We went out looking fresh, and no pain at all. It was a weird sensation, but nothing bad. After a couple of more treatments, we both noticed a great improvement, not just in removing the sun damaged areas but tightening our face. It was just like natural face lift, with no surgery or anything. It’s awesome!
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8)    Watch and wait: Growth factors contained in the plasma stimulate the release of the skin’s stem cells. The skin is being tricked into believing that it has been injured and must heal itself with new, fresh tissue. This somewhat sneaky process allows the skin to create new collagen, new blood vessels, and new cells. The results will not be immediate, so while you patiently wait a few weeks and even a few months, your skin will begin to transform itself.

No, a Vampire Facial mixes PRP with Microneedling to address skin texture and thickness. It doesn’t offer the lifted result that a Vampire Facelift does, and it doesn’t address wrinkles. Typically, Vampire Facials are more of a preventative treatment used by younger patients who want to build collagen actively before it starts to diminish with age, or for those who are looking to improve mild acne scarring without the downtime of a laser.
The incredible healing power of the blood was discovered in the 1960s when scientists found the hematopoietic stem cells hiding there. Research into the power of these and many other stem cells has made ground-breaking strides in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases ever since. As we learn more about what stem cells can do and how we can use them to treat a wider array of conditions the procedures have most often been up to the task making headway in degenerative and chronic conditions that previously had no other treatment but management and coping. As they grow in popularity, procedures focused on using stem cells and growth factors already present in our bodies have expanded to including cosmetic procedures like hair loss and beauty treatments. The Vampire Facial, also known as Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Facial Treatment, surged in popularity when Kim Kardashian braved the procedure on her reality show. The pictures circulating of her sporting a bloody face sparked conversation among beauty influencers everywhere asking is this treatment effective and how does it work?
Professional athletes from almost every sport have shown us the regenerative and healing power of PRP treatments by using them to return to the game sooner from damage to muscles, tendons, and ligaments. During PRP treatments, the platelets in the blood that contain growth factors that command the immune system are isolated from the blood and injected back into the effected area. Many people have used PRP treatments as an effective way to avoid risky medication side effects and surgery. The treatment offers a quicker recovery and supports the body’s natural healing process organically without an invasive procedure. The power of platelets are no longer restricted to internal treatments however, vampire facials take the science of platelet treatments and uses it to improve your skin.
The New Mexico Department of Health announced this week that that a client of VIP Spa developed an undisclosed infection that may have come from having a vampire facial treatment done at the spa. The organization is urging people who got any "injection related service, including a vampire facial," to get tested for hepatitis B and C along with HIV. (The clinic has been shut down, BTW.)

The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.
The platelet rich plasma (PRP) delivery to the dermis further enhances the micro needle treatment so collagen and other skin enhancing support is stimulated by the growth factors in the platelet rich plasma (PRP). The platelet rich plasma (PRP) also has factors which stimulate blood supply to the skin. This creates a look of glow and luster to the skin which is unique to platelet rich plasma.
The effects of the procedure improve for 2 to 3 months after the procedure and last for at least 1 to 2 years! Unlike most procedures, the Vampire Facelift (R) offers a way of restoring shape, and improving tone and texture, as well as literally rejuvenating new and younger tissue! The multipotent stem cells then develop into new collagen, new blood vessels, and new fatty tissue trying to “repair” the skin that was never injured! The result…younger-appearing skin!

Very impressed at initial visit. Will be using their hormone replacement therapy. I like the fact they will not just look at my blood work but will go by how I feel. We are not all made the same so bl…oodwork alone doesn't work for me. Also impressed they offer another blood test to show all vitamin levels which will take the guesswork out of what supplements I need and/or don't need. Can't wait to get results of both so I can get my life back. On another note, they have the cleanest offices I have ever seen. more »
A Stem Cell Facelift with Fat Transfer combines PRP with Nanofat and Fat Transfer. For those with thin, sagging skin and loss of fat volume, this offers the longest-lasting and most natural results possible. Nanofat is a process of harvesting the stem cells in your fat. In this procedure, we combine those stem cells with the growth and healing factors of PRP for skin texture, tone, and elasticity. We also use your own fat, taken from your midsection, to replace what your face has lost with age (or weight loss). This procedure creates brand new cells, for results that are all you. It is more expensive than a Vampire Facelift and does have about 3-7 days of downtime.

Platelet rich plasma is a pretty new procedure which uses your own blood to improve skin quality. If you are looking for more volume and fillings I think you are better of having a liquid facelift or even a laser facelift treatment. I found it to be effective in skin texture and skin tone so it really depends on what results you are hoping for. Combining good skincare post treatment is a good way to maintain your skin and the prp results will also last longer.
Huge thank you to @the_glam_nurse at @healthfinity for this amazingggg #VampireFacial today!!💉💀😈 After numbing your face, your blood is drawn & spun down into a gel-like plasma that's injected into the skin with a micropen. This stimulates collagen production to increase facial volume while diminishing pores, fine lines & wrinkles for an overall youthful radiance! Safe to say I'm obsessed already😍 Use me as a referral for a discount on all your skincare needs!! @healthfinity @healthfinity @healthfinity #PreventativeSkinCare #PRP #PlateletRichPlasma
A Vampire Facelift is performed by injecting a filler (such as hyaluronic acid, Juvederm or Restylane) into areas of the face that need a “boost” and then injecting the PRP. You’ll get the benefits of the filler adding volume and shape as well as the growth factors that help the body generate new, younger tissue. Essentially the skin is “fertilized” from the inside out. You’ll see a reduction in fine lines and an increase in volume but also improved tone, color and texture. The Vampire Facelift is an excellent solution for patients who have facial volume loss that occurs after weight loss or due to aging.
The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.
Do not use LATISSE® if you are allergic to one of its ingredients. If you use/used prescription products for eye pressure problems, use LATISSE® under doctor care. May cause brown darkening of the colored part of the eye which is likely permanent. LATISSE® may cause eyelid skin darkening which may be reversible. Only apply at base of upper lashes. DO NOT APPLY to lower lid. Hair may grow outside the treatment area. If you have eye problems/surgery, consult your doctor. Common side effects include itchy and red eyes. If discontinued, lashes gradually return to previous appearance.
The Selphyl treatment is a gradual process, so don’t worry if you don’t see any immediate results – it can take four weeks for results to become apparent, with improvements seen around the six to 12 week mark. Most people report looking more refreshed and youthful, with a noticeable improvement in skin tone and texture. Overall, the results can last 12+ months.
The main differentiator of the Vampire Facial is that instead of injecting the patient’s PRP in to the face, you use microneedling device, such as the Dermapen, to create microscopic pinpoint injuries to the face and then apply the PRP directly onto the surface of the skin. This process was famously used on reality TV star Kim Kardashian and went viral in 2014.
The basic PRP treatment has been used for almost 20 years to accelerate the healing of wounds and burnt skin, and help athletes - including, reportedly, tennis ace Rafael Nadal - recover from injury. But it was when Dr Charles Runels from Alabama trademarked the name "Vampire Facelift" in 2010, during the craze for the Vampire Diaries and Twilight Saga, that the procedure became attractive for A-listers.
Is there a clinic around Parramatta that does the vampire face lift? Is the blood facial kim kardashian did the vampire face lift or prp plasma facial or something else? I was reading online about it and have since been keen to get one myself. The prp plasma facial does have its advantages, but I must ask. Who says that injecting your own blood is going to get you great results? I mean, do the doctors first test your blood? I’m guessing you can’t just do it if you have some sort of a disease, or does it matter at all? And, one more thing. Do they use the same vampire injection on everyone?

When I expressed my concern for the blood-free end result, Dr. Peredo and Nurse Shellock explained that part of why Kim K looked so bloody is because, back in 2013 when that particular episode of Kim and Kourtney Take Miami aired, the normal vampire facial procedure was to apply whole blood to the skin while microneedling, where nowadays technology has advanced to using the most regenerating part of blood, the PRP. While both methods use blood drawn on site, the PRP method extracts the platelets from the red blood cells after being put through the centrifuge. And so, I finally understood why my Kim K-inspired expectations weren’t fully met. 
When you hear the name vampire facelift, it can make you think of a lot of different things. Pale skin, long fangs, Brad Pitt… However, it’s a great alternative to an actual, surgical facelift. What makes the vampire facelift even more enticing, is that this kind of facelift doesn’t use any artificial products, thus making it a much safer choice. That’s reassuring to hear since it’s going into your own body. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to brighten up your face a little bit, and with a vampire facelift, you can do this pretty quickly, with few side effects and a short recovery time.
The idea is that this will cause skin to appear younger — and for skin care nerds, this makes the few-hundred-dollar price tag and non-minuscule amount of pain worth it. The prevailing attitude toward skin care these days seem to be, “Even if there haven’t been loads of studies about whether or not this one product will erase all my wrinkles, it still might, and also it’s probably not going to harm me.”
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