Briefly, here's how it works: A doctor will draw blood from you, spin it in a centrifuge to extract the PRP, and then inject or apply it topically. The treatment "is being used to improve skin tone and texture, smooth fine lines, and even promote hair growth," Joshua Zeichner, director of clinical and cosmetic research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City previously told Allure.

I was intrigued after delving into some research on the PRP (platelet-rich plasma) Growth Factor Facial. I actually started to come around to the idea of having tiny needles continuously plunged into my plasma-covered face. You see, the bloody facial featured on Keeping Up with the Kardashians is actually called the “Vampire Facelift™”. It is a trademarked procedure that is different from the one I would be receiving. The Kardashian-endorsed version involves filler injections. I was relieved to learn that Dr.Lorenc’s did not. A little Botox here and there is one thing, but a face full of fillers is another.
“Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is widely used in regenerative medicine because of its high concentrations of various growth factors and platelets,” says this research study from Japan. Platelets contain more than 30 different growth factors, and according to VampireFacial.com, the official site of Vampire Facials, “These growth factors activate multipotent stem cells already in the skin (tricking them into thinking there’s been an injury and new, younger tissue should [be] generated).”
Most SkinMedica® products are intended to meet the FDA’s definition of a cosmetic product, an article applied to the human body to cleanse, beautify, promote attractiveness, and alter appearances. These SkinMedica® products are not intended to be drug products that diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or condition. These products have not been approved by the FDA, and the statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
Earlier this week, the New Mexico Department of Health announced the closure of a spa in Albuquerque after one of their clients reportedly developed an “unspecified infection” sometime after getting a “vampire facial.” During an inspection of the facility on Friday morning, health department officials became concerned about the way the spa was managing the storage, handling and disposal of needles.
The procedure was made famous by Kim Kardashian, who underwent a procedure called “The Vampire Facial” in 2013 (referring to it as a “blood facial”). When The Vampire Facelift® or the Vampire Facial is done properly, the patient will not experience any significant pain or have much blood on their face, unlike Kim Kardashian’s much publicized experience with the procedure.

A non-surgical cosmetic procedure that involves withdrawing a patient’s own blood, processing it to create “platelet-rich plasma (PRP),” then re-injecting it into multiple areas of the skin of the patients face in an effort to treat and erase wrinkles and create a more youthful look. By combining the application of hyaluronic acid fillers with blood derived growth factors the Vampire FaceLift® offers a unique balanced approach to reviving your beauty, wrinkles and “rejuvenate” the face.
Another thing you should be prepared for? The way to care for your skin post-treatment. Dr. Peredo advised that since vampire facials drive tiny needles into your skin, creating pathways for PRP to dive deep into your pores for truly transformative results, you want to stay away from anything else that could seep into that sacred space and irritate it. Think: makeup and skin-care acids. Don’t worry though, living in the no-makeup world that we live in, no one will bat an eye, and you’ll be able to return to your favorite cosmetics in two short days. With acids, on the other hand, it’s best to wait a full week. Simple enough. 

The Vampire Facial ® is protected by US Patent & Trademark Law. Only providers listed on this site are members of the Vampire Facial Provider Group, know the trade secrets of  the Vampire Facial®, have agreed to use FDA approved equipment, and own license to use the "Vampire" name.  Any others using the name "Vampire Facial" (or any variation) are not members of the group, are violating trademark/patent law, may be doing an inferior  (even dangerous) procedure, and are subject to prosecution.
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