After using injectable fillers to achieve a more youthful appearance, your injector will draw your blood. Typically, we’ll only need to draw around 2 teaspoons. Your blood will be run through a centrifuge to separate and isolate platelet rich plasma, which is also known as growth factors. These specific “growth factors” have been identified to help heal damaged tissue. These growth factors have been known to work like magic to cause increased collagen and improved blood flow to the tissue.
After using injectable fillers to achieve a more youthful appearance, your injector will draw your blood. Typically, we’ll only need to draw around 2 teaspoons. Your blood will be run through a centrifuge to separate and isolate platelet rich plasma, which is also known as growth factors. These specific “growth factors” have been identified to help heal damaged tissue. These growth factors have been known to work like magic to cause increased collagen and improved blood flow to the tissue.
Providers of the Vampire Facelift (R) procedure take into account the mathematics of beauty as defined by much research (starting with the notebooks of Lonardo da Vinci) to avoid at all costs creating an unnatural shape.  These ideas about the HA fillers are not commonly known even among the best of cosmetic surgeons and constitute part of the intellectual property protected by the trademarked name (Vampire Facelift®).
There's no evidence at all that this gory procedure works, and only the babiest starting evidence that injecting platelets into the skin works at all against the appearance of aging. But there probably is little harm, at least, to plasma injections because they deal with the patient's own body fluids, dermatologists say. The technologies dermatologists use for the facials are U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for adding plasma to bone before orthopedic surgery... but not for wrinkle-busting.
Most likely, says Shamban. Those with "premature wrinkles, high levels of solar damage, or anyone who wants an even tone and fresher appearance to their skin," is an ideal candidate for the procedure, she says. However, Zeichner warns that if you have a history of blood diseases, including clotting or bleeding disorders, you should not seek PRP treatment.
Most likely, says Shamban. Those with "premature wrinkles, high levels of solar damage, or anyone who wants an even tone and fresher appearance to their skin," is an ideal candidate for the procedure, she says. However, Zeichner warns that if you have a history of blood diseases, including clotting or bleeding disorders, you should not seek PRP treatment.
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