This is so funny, because my friends used to tease me my entire life that I looked like a vampire because of my under eye circles. They were bad. I am pale, and they were so dark, I was beginning to think I was related to Dracula. My friend said that I should go do a Vampire face-lift, and I thought it was some kind of a joke, obviously. But she was really serious. Then I read about it, and it’s actually like a mini face lift, that is supposed to rejuvenate your face and improve the areas you are not happy with, by using your own blood. That didn’t sound bad to me, and after all the years of teasing I decide to try out the platelet rich plasma therapy, that was so raved about. I have to say that the results weren’t immediate. But after a few months my dark circles became lighter and lighter…I still kept my nickname, but now it’s funny to me, since I know it’s the Vampire therapy that actually helps me.

The Vampire Facial® procedure, using a specific technique for micro-needing, followed by application of PRP. The Vampire Facelift® procedure involves using Juvederm to restore shape followed by injecting PRP below the dermis the help restore color and texture along with enhancing a normal shape.  The Vampire Facial® procedure is described in more detail here.

"It’s rare for an incident like what happened in New Mexico to occur with PRP therapy, though it can be avoided by working with a qualified properly licensed physician provider," Hah said. "The spa operating in New Mexico did not have the credentials to perform this kind of medical procedure. Since their license expired, there was no oversight of the spa’s safety and cleanliness practices. Per the Department of Health’s findings, it appears the spa in question did not properly store, handle, or dispose of used needles."
First and foremost, Kim, as much as we love her (or hate to love her, or whatever), is dramatic AF. At no point during the treatment was I compelled to whimper and cry in pain. Sure, there were moments—most notably, when the Dermapen grazed over the area of my forehead just above my brows leading up to my hairline—where it felt like I was being scalped, but since it was so brief, my pain receptors didn’t even have the chance to trigger tears—or, more surprisingly, blood. 
Step 3 is taking the isolated PRP created from the previous step and injecting it into strategic areas. Using a very small needle, you will be injected with your own growth factors in a particular way. These growth factors then activate multi-potent stem cells already in the skin, tricking them into “thinking” there’s been an injury and then generate newer, and younger tissue.
The Vampire Facelift is considered a medical treatment in all states. Consult with patients about their medical history and conduct a brief physical exam to accept them for treatment. The exam should be performed by a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner. Only doctors and licensed medical professionals can draw blood and make injections, but trained medical spa employees can apply surface PRP without needles or micro-needling devices. Talk to your state medical board or health care attorney to learn more about the rules in your state.
There are several prescription injections that are FDA-approved for temporarily improving wrinkles or padding the face to look younger. Some of the better-known names include Botox, Restylane and Juvederm, but there are lots of others. Sclafani and Katz say the reasons to use platelet-rich plasma instead of other injections is that the plasma is "natural" and doesn't carry the risk of allergy or rejection—because it's your own blood.

That’s why it’s imperative that when you receive treatment (whether medical or for physical changes), you ensure that the needles used are either new or were properly sanitized. Before beginning a procedure, be sure to ask about their sanitizing procedures. Ask if you can watch them open a new needle or sanitize a used one. If they don’t use disposable needles, ask to watch the needle undergo its sanitization, and check that their sanitizer has been recently inspected. This may feel awkward at the time, but a true professional will understand your concern and the risks that are involved.
I have a few questions about vampire facials. First off, do you have more than one done? So if I have one this summer and the results are not what I expect, can I go back at a later date and have another one done? Or is this just a one time thing? I also would like to know how soon can I expect to see results? And what is the downtime of having a vampire facial?
Very impressed at initial visit. Will be using their hormone replacement therapy. I like the fact they will not just look at my blood work but will go by how I feel. We are not all made the same so bl…oodwork alone doesn't work for me. Also impressed they offer another blood test to show all vitamin levels which will take the guesswork out of what supplements I need and/or don't need. Can't wait to get results of both so I can get my life back. On another note, they have the cleanest offices I have ever seen. more »
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
×