The Vampire Facial® procedure, using a specific technique for micro-needing, followed by application of PRP. The Vampire Facelift® procedure involves using Juvederm to restore shape followed by injecting PRP below the dermis the help restore color and texture along with enhancing a normal shape.  The Vampire Facial® procedure is described in more detail here.
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Briefly, here's how it works: A doctor will draw blood from you, spin it in a centrifuge to extract the PRP, and then inject or apply it topically. The treatment "is being used to improve skin tone and texture, smooth fine lines, and even promote hair growth," Joshua Zeichner, director of clinical and cosmetic research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City previously told Allure.
The day leading up to my appointment, my best friend continually cringed at the idea of my soon-to-be bloody face while my mom made sure to text me every five minutes asking if this is really something I wanted to go through with, having sensitive skin and all. While their concerns pushed me to the point of advising my editor that I may need to work from home the next day if I look busted AF (since bruising and redness are possible short-term results), I stuck to my appointment and headed to the Upper East Side to arrive early for a treatment that, at the very best, could change the way I view my complexion, and, at the very worst, put me out of commission for a couple of days. 
PRFM has been available on the U.S. market since 2009. It was developed and is marketed by the Aesthetic Factors corporation.[1] While a platelet extraction centrifuge was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002 As of March 2011 platelets extracted in this centrifuge have not been cleared or approved by the FDA for facial rejuvenation.[1] Nonetheless, Selphyl has been described as a "FDA approved dermal filler" in YouTube videos and trade publications.[1]
Briefly, here's how it works: A doctor will draw blood from you, spin it in a centrifuge to extract the PRP, and then inject or apply it topically. The treatment "is being used to improve skin tone and texture, smooth fine lines, and even promote hair growth," Joshua Zeichner, director of clinical and cosmetic research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City previously told Allure.

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PRP is a concentrated source of platelets, growth factors and cytokines produced naturally in your own body, and stimulates and controls healthy regenerative processes, including collagen and soft tissue remodeling, and thereby improves overall health and rejuvenation. PRP has been used successfully for years to promote improved healing times and optimal results from various surgical and non-surgical procedures. The PRP, painlessly obtained through a small blood draw, is injected after dermal filler and enhances the results of this amazing procedure.
Once the treatment is complete, Chang applies a soothing cream that contains stem cells and then sunscreen to the patient’s face. She compares the treatment to a chemical peel or a laser in terms of inducing local trauma to boost collagen. To further accelerate the healing process for patients, Chang often uses an LED light. For about 20 minutes post-procedure, patients remain on the treatment table under a tri-paneled lamp. Infrared light is known to accelerate skin recovery and red light is known to reduce inflammation.
"The jury is still out on how effective this procedure is, but many feel that it can significantly help improve skin tone, texture, and fine lines," says Joshua Zeichner, M.D., a New York City–based board-certified dermatologist and director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center. Basically, the idea is that it can make your skin look plump and glowy (and younger).
You've probably seen the photos on Instagram: A celebrity or influencer's face covered with blood splatter. No, it's not Halloween makeup, it's actually one of the latest treatment trends in skin care, also known as a "vampire facial." Celebrities, including Kim Kardashian West and Bar Refaeli, are fans of the facial, which might look quite scary, but boasts big-time results.
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