Some of you hate this treatment so much. Really? It’s the best thing I’ve read about out there, medically speaking. Why do so many women have prejudice about something before they try it? Personally, I think the vampire facial is a great way, and a healthy way to rejuvenate your skin, and to feel fresh. It’s not like you’re really a vampire, and I get the impression in many vampire facial reviews that women consider it scary. I had it done, and I have great results and I am so thrilled I just want to spread the joy. Not because now I look great, but because more and more people need to try this! It’s really effective, the results are visible very fast. It’s not that painful either. None of you should really hate anything before you try it, but I guess that’s the old way of people and it’s never going to change. As far as I’m concerned the vampire facial is great!


No, a Vampire Facial mixes PRP with Microneedling to address skin texture and thickness. It doesn’t offer the lifted result that a Vampire Facelift does, and it doesn’t address wrinkles. Typically, Vampire Facials are more of a preventative treatment used by younger patients who want to build collagen actively before it starts to diminish with age, or for those who are looking to improve mild acne scarring without the downtime of a laser.
If the procedure is carried out properly, the risks are low, except for people with blood-related medical issues, especially those which require blood-thinning medication. The microneedling causes temporary bleeding—hence the name "Vampire facial". Meanwhile, bruising, swelling, redness and pain may persist over the injection site, but these side effects usually disappear within a few days.
The Vampire Facial has become popular thanks to celebrities having the procedure to keep their skin looking camera ready and glowing. The Vampire Facial is a procedure which combines platelet rich plasma (PRP) with the use of micro needle dermal stimulation (rejuvapen). The medical micro needle procedure using the Rejuvapen is a method of “collagen induction therapy” also referred to as “CIT”. The small entries into the dermis cause the skin to respond with collagen which softens the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles as well as superficial sun damage.
The Vampire Facial requires little recovery time. There may be redness and some tenderness on the first day that appears much like sunburn. Occasionally some bruising may occur. The initial redness will subside on the second day, and some patients then notice some swelling and a sandpaper texture to the skin the day after treatment. By the third day, the swelling should diminish. The sandpaper texture to the skin may persist for up to a week.
"It’s rare for an incident like what happened in New Mexico to occur with PRP therapy, though it can be avoided by working with a qualified properly licensed physician provider," Hah said. "The spa operating in New Mexico did not have the credentials to perform this kind of medical procedure. Since their license expired, there was no oversight of the spa’s safety and cleanliness practices. Per the Department of Health’s findings, it appears the spa in question did not properly store, handle, or dispose of used needles."
After the fifth day, my skin tone and texture was pretty much back to normal, though I had a new giant zit (named Bertha). I did notice that my face looked brighter and that some sun spots were lighter. The results of the PRP facials are supposed to be really noticeable after multiple sessions, so I’d be curious if my acne scars could really be erased with regular procedures. Dr. Moelleken says a series of three treatments set up a month apart would yield significant results. After that, maintenance treatments every three to six months are recommended.
So, what is it and how does it work, exactly? Don't let the name fool you. In fact, "It's usually done in full light of day," says Beverly Hills-based dermatologist Ava Shamban. In all seriousness, the treatment is a "combination of a microdermabrasion, followed by the application of PRP (platelet-rich plasma)," says Shamban. "The PRP is derived from the serum portion of the blood, which contains platelets. The platelets contain high levels of growth factors, which, when applied to the skin, will stimulate cell turnover."
×