A vampire facial is a type of facial treatment that rejuvenates the face using via PRP, or platelet-rich plasma—a serum made from the client's own blood. Vials of withdrawn blood are spun in a centrifuge until it separates, isolating the red and white blood cells from the plasma, an amber serum rich in platelets. "If it's a little hazy, you might have some other stuff floating around [in it], and you can spin it again to maximize your serum," Dr. Arviv said.
The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.
A Vampire Facelift and Vampire Facial are similar in that they are both non-invasive aesthetic treatments only offered by practitioners who have undergone extensive proprietary training, certification, and follow-up education. Patients can feel confident that the process will be as comfortable as possible and give results that exceed expectations. In addition, both procedures utilize PRP in a way that encourages the skin to heal itself and look its best for a significant time after the procedure. Results will continuously improve for a few weeks after the process and usually last for at least 12 months, and often times longer.

Your best bet is to schedule a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has experience with all facial rejuvenation techniques and technologies. Due to the large number of doctors promoting themselves as qualified cosmetic surgeons, choosing a surgeon can be a challenge. To make this task easier, Consumer Guide to Plastic Surgery has created a directory that exclusively lists surgeons who are board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS). Certification by the ABPS is widely accepted as the highest level of certification possible for plastic surgeons in the United States. Choosing one of these doctors guarantees you will be treated by a surgeon who has undergone extensive education, training and testing and is in excellent standing among his or her peers in the medical field.


Aside from the novelty of having a Dracula-inspired skin treatment done, the benefits of the PRP facial appealed to me. The PRP injections can help stimulate collagen. Combined with microneedling, the treatment can result in scar reduction, correction of sun damage, and minimizing fine lines and pores. And because the PRP is coming out of your own bod, there are no risk of side effects! However, patients who have blood disorders or take blood thinners should skip this type of procedure.
Dermal fillers add youthful volume to the face, while keeping a natural appearance. Hyaluronic acid fillers do not paralyze facial muscles like Botox, so volume is added without inhibiting facial movement or expressions. There is an art to the application of fillers for a natural and youthful appearance, and you can be confident that Dr. Prasad will apply his natural artistic abilities, technical skills and 20 years’ worth of experience to perform your procedure in the best possible way.
A Vampire Facelift is performed by injecting a filler (such as hyaluronic acid, Juvederm or Restylane) into areas of the face that need a “boost” and then injecting the PRP. You’ll get the benefits of the filler adding volume and shape as well as the growth factors that help the body generate new, younger tissue. Essentially the skin is “fertilized” from the inside out. You’ll see a reduction in fine lines and an increase in volume but also improved tone, color and texture. The Vampire Facelift is an excellent solution for patients who have facial volume loss that occurs after weight loss or due to aging.
Vampire facials aren’t all that new, but you can pretty much narrow down their popularity in the past few years to one woman: Kim Kardashian. In 2013, she Instagrammed a rather shocking photo of her blood-soaked face as a way to promote that night’s episode of Kourtney & Kim Take Miami (RIP), leading to a barrage of news outlets to ask, “Uh, what’s the deal with this weird new skin care thing?”
While your face will look red, swollen and bloody immediately after the treatment (it can last a few hours to up to three days after), the results (you’ll see glowing skin immediately but it can take a month or so for the full results, which last about three months, to surface) it provides for cellular rejuvenation are unparalleled because it shortens healing time and stimulates collagen. “Athletes have used it to heal sprains, and now dermatologists are using the technique for hair restoration,” says Dr. Cheung.
A. Think of Selphyl® PRFM as the next generation PRP. The Selphyl® System is designed for the safe and rapid preparation of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix (PRFM) from a small sample of blood (only 10cc). Many PRP systems require operator skill, have varying results and have extensive contamination with red blood cells and white blood cells. Selphyl® removes virtually all contaminating cells and is independent of operator technique. PRP is converted to PRFM through a controlled process (mixed w/ calcium chloride in a vial) to form a fibrin matrix scaffold that serves to protect and preserve platelets, thus creating more therapeutic rejuvenation.
There's no evidence at all that this gory procedure works, and only the babiest starting evidence that injecting platelets into the skin works at all against the appearance of aging. But there probably is little harm, at least, to plasma injections because they deal with the patient's own body fluids, dermatologists say. The technologies dermatologists use for the facials are U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for adding plasma to bone before orthopedic surgery... but not for wrinkle-busting.
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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