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I’m not going to lie, I wasn’t super amped about this assignment because it sounded like this was going to hurt, but I’ll do whatever it takes for a good story. Plus, I knew I was in good hands because one of my favorite estheticians, Rhiannon Terese would be performing the treatment at Lorenc Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and Med Spa. Dr.Lorenc is famous for inventing the Botox brow lift. As a fan of Botox I took this as a very good sign. That and the fact that I’d heard nothing but rave reviews about the plastic surgeon and his practice.

The evidence isn’t clear for either of those assumptions in this case. PRP has been studied in a variety of medical settings to assist with healing, but evidence that shows it helps with skin rejuvenation are still relatively new. Dermatologists do seem to agree that PRP can improve pores, acne scars, and fine lines, which have caused vampire facials to become very popular, especially at med spas like the one in New Mexico.


Before receiving KYBELLA®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: Have had or plan to have surgery on your face, neck, or chin; have had cosmetic treatments on your face, neck, or chin; have had or have medical conditions in or near the neck area; have had or have trouble swallowing; have bleeding problems; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if KYBELLA® will harm your unborn baby); are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed (it is not known if KYBELLA® passes into your breast milk).

The Vampire Facial, on the other hand, is a type of skin resurfacing treatment (such as microneedling or microdermabrasion) which is followed by microneedling of PRP into the skin. The benefit of this method of treatment is that the tiny needles used with microneedling “trick” your body into thinking there is an injury, so new collagen is produced. Though the tiny needles may make the skin look red or irritated for a short while after treatment, it is well known to look much worse than it feels! The results are extremely beneficial for those with fine lines or those who have acne scars or other imperfections they would like to improve.

Your surgeon draws blood from your arm (not your neck, as many a movie vampire has been known to do) and spins it to separate out the plasma, which contains platelets. These are the proteins and growth factors that may stimulate collagen production and thereby promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation. There are several kits available to isolate these growth factors, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Once collected, the PRP is injected back into your face.
Briefly, here's how it works: A doctor will draw blood from you, spin it in a centrifuge to extract the PRP, and then inject or apply it topically. The treatment "is being used to improve skin tone and texture, smooth fine lines, and even promote hair growth," Joshua Zeichner, director of clinical and cosmetic research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City previously told Allure.

Providers of the Vampire Facelift (R) procedure take into account the mathematics of beauty as defined by much research (starting with the notebooks of Lonardo da Vinci) to avoid at all costs creating an unnatural shape.  These ideas about the HA fillers are not commonly known even among the best of cosmetic surgeons and constitute part of the intellectual property protected by the trademarked name (Vampire Facelift®).
I got it done on Thursday and my face looks like I’ve been run over by a bus. .. I’m so sorry I had it done would I go back and do it again never. .my face is every sore ….my worries are I just hope my face is okay and I can go back to the way I use to look. . Just don’t do it. ..I would not listen to any one and got it done and look at me now iv been in pain four days now ..don’t do it. ….
The evidence isn’t clear for either of those assumptions in this case. PRP has been studied in a variety of medical settings to assist with healing, but evidence that shows it helps with skin rejuvenation are still relatively new. Dermatologists do seem to agree that PRP can improve pores, acne scars, and fine lines, which have caused vampire facials to become very popular, especially at med spas like the one in New Mexico.
“Thanks to modern science, we now know that platelets contain various factors that stimulate the production of collagen, elastic fibers and new blood vessels,” says Mandeville. “Microneedling causes direct trauma to the skin. As a result, the body rushes to repair the wounds, sending platelets and cells to the rescue. As platelets play a significant role in terms of growth factors, it seems particularly appealing to inject the plasma back into the skin through the punctured holes to really speed up the healing of the tissues.”
Your best bet is to schedule a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has experience with all facial rejuvenation techniques and technologies. Due to the large number of doctors promoting themselves as qualified cosmetic surgeons, choosing a surgeon can be a challenge. To make this task easier, Consumer Guide to Plastic Surgery has created a directory that exclusively lists surgeons who are board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS). Certification by the ABPS is widely accepted as the highest level of certification possible for plastic surgeons in the United States. Choosing one of these doctors guarantees you will be treated by a surgeon who has undergone extensive education, training and testing and is in excellent standing among his or her peers in the medical field.

A. Using blood plasma to heal and regenerate the body originated from Orthopedics (FDA approved) and has numerous studies substantiating the regeneration and healing of injuries and tissue repair. PRP evolved from there for the purpose of skin rejuvenation. PRP means PLATELET RICH PLASMA, where the platelet concentration is generally considered to be double the normal concentration in whole blood. Red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) should be removed as much as possible from a PRP preparation. Some kits that tout high platelet concentrations often do so at the expense of having contaminating RBCs or WBCs – these cells are known to have inflammatory and catabolic effects – just the opposite of the desired effect. If the PRP in the syringe has any tinge of pink or red, it is mostly likely that you are injecting a preparation that has RBC contamination. The ideal PRP solution will be a golden, straw-like color.
The vampire facelift takes approximately 30 to 40 minutes to perform. Before the procedure is performed, the surgeon needs to first draw blood from the patient (not with fangs, but with a syringe), then separate the platelets from the blood. The platelets and various natural fillers are then injected into the areas the patient has requested, such as the cheeks, mouth lines, under the eyes, etc. The vampire facelift costs anywhere between $800 to $1500, depending on where you have it done. If you have it done in a bigger city like San Francisco or New York, you’re going to pay a little more. As for recovery time, your face may be a little red afterwards, but it will go away in a few hours.
Your doctor draws blood from your arm and spins it to separate out the plasma, which contains platelets. These are the proteins and growth factors that stimulate collagen production and thereby promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation. There are many kits available to isolate these growth factors, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Once collected, the platelet-rich plasma is injected back into your face.
If you haven't heard of the PRP facial, that's probably because it's more commonly called a vampire facial. What is a vampire facial? The name doesn't mean it's administered by vampires. (Sadly, it's not even administered by werewolves.) Below, we attempt to answer the most frequently asked vampire facial questions, with some help from two PRP-facial providers: Dr. Soroosh Mashayekh of Irvine Wellness and Cosmetic Clinic and Dr. Tali Arviv of Arviv Medical Aesthetics.
You've probably seen the photos on Instagram: A celebrity or influencer's face covered with blood splatter. No, it's not Halloween makeup, it's actually one of the latest treatment trends in skin care, also known as a "vampire facial." Celebrities, including Kim Kardashian West and Bar Refaeli, are fans of the facial, which might look quite scary, but boasts big-time results.
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