Briefly, here's how it works: A doctor will draw blood from you, spin it in a centrifuge to extract the PRP, and then inject or apply it topically. The treatment "is being used to improve skin tone and texture, smooth fine lines, and even promote hair growth," Joshua Zeichner, director of clinical and cosmetic research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City previously told Allure.
Providers of the Vampire Facelift (R) procedure take into account the mathematics of beauty as defined by much research (starting with the notebooks of Lonardo da Vinci) to avoid at all costs creating an unnatural shape.  These ideas about the HA fillers are not commonly known even among the best of cosmetic surgeons and constitute part of the intellectual property protected by the trademarked name (Vampire Facelift®).
The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.
I am 31. I am quite familiar with every procedure there is out there. My first advice would be to seek out a skilled professional who knows exactly what he is doing, and what best suits you. I did a vampire facial in Sydney, in a very well-known dermatology clinic. It was by far the best facial experience I had with the results that came in gradually, but were very obvious. It is really a non-surgical facelift, no doubt about it. The blood cells are treated in a way that aid your skin to produce more and more collagen, and the skin itself actually starts to feel more soft, smooth and elastic. Just like when I was 15. It’s really amazing, and harmless. There is nothing bad I can say about it, I’d just say be careful who does it. Do your research and choose a reputable doctor who will examine you, care for you and do follow ups if necessary.
Yasemin is a staff writer at Live Science, writing about biology and neuroscience, among other science topics. Yasemin has a biomedical engineering bachelors from the University of Connecticut and a science communication graduate certificate from the University of California, Santa Cruz. When she's not writing, she's probably taking photos or sitting upside-down on her couch thinking about thinking and wondering if anyone else is thinking about thinking at the exact same time.
PRFM is an outpatient procedures that, as of March 2011, costs about $900 to $1,500 in the U.S. and takes less than half an hour. Blood is drawn from the patient's arm and spun in a centrifuge to separate out the platelets, which are then injected back under the patient's facial skin. It can also be combined in a specific way with other fillers. A procedure using this combination has been marketed as the "Vampire facelift"."[1]

Each person that walks through Dr.Lorenc’s door is treated to this eye-opening analysis so the doctor or esthetician can choose the procedure that will best address the patient’s skin care needs. I am not going to lie, I was pretty psyched that my skin’s texture had a near-perfect score of 98%. Hopefully, my Growth Factor Facial would seal the deal on those two pesky percentage points.


A. Exclusive to FACE, the PRP Stem Cell VIVA™ uses fractional radiofrequency with PRFM to cause collagen contraction, for more therapeutic rejuvenation resulting in firming of the skin, and overall more dramatic results. Great for individuals with more photo-aged skin. The PRP Stem Cell DIVA™ combines the Stem Cell Facial with PPFM with therapeutic oxygen and broad spectrum light therapy to stimulate collagen and elastin more and plump up the skin for that untouchable red carpet glow.
If women knew how much a face lift costs, a real surgical face lift that is, they would never even think twice about getting the vampire facial. Apart from being less expensive, it is really comfortable to go through. It’s a bit weird in the beginning, you feel sort of awkward getting your own blood injected into your face, or the areas which you treat. But once you accept it and get used to it, it’s amazing. It’s so modern and it really gives it all that it can. My cheeks now don’t sag that much. They don’t look like old bags of tea anymore, but are more plump now. The rest of my face has changed a bit as well, it’s not that dry anymore, and the skin just looks and feels different. I would describe it as a non surgical facelift, with great benefits, less expenses, less pain, less recovery.
“Thanks to modern science, we now know that platelets contain various factors that stimulate the production of collagen, elastic fibers and new blood vessels,” says Mandeville. “Microneedling causes direct trauma to the skin. As a result, the body rushes to repair the wounds, sending platelets and cells to the rescue. As platelets play a significant role in terms of growth factors, it seems particularly appealing to inject the plasma back into the skin through the punctured holes to really speed up the healing of the tissues.”
A. Think of Selphyl® PRFM as the next generation PRP. The Selphyl® System is designed for the safe and rapid preparation of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix (PRFM) from a small sample of blood (only 10cc). Many PRP systems require operator skill, have varying results and have extensive contamination with red blood cells and white blood cells. Selphyl® removes virtually all contaminating cells and is independent of operator technique. PRP is converted to PRFM through a controlled process (mixed w/ calcium chloride in a vial) to form a fibrin matrix scaffold that serves to protect and preserve platelets, thus creating more therapeutic rejuvenation.

PRFM is an outpatient procedures that, as of March 2011, costs about $900 to $1,500 in the U.S. and takes less than half an hour. Blood is drawn from the patient's arm and spun in a centrifuge to separate out the platelets, which are then injected back under the patient's facial skin. It can also be combined in a specific way with other fillers. A procedure using this combination has been marketed as the "Vampire facelift"."[1]

Vampire facials could be an alternative for people concerned about the potentially harmful ingredients in most cosmetic products that promise the same results. The average price for a complete vampire facial treatment, which is usually comprised of 3 treatments over the course of a year, is anywhere from $1,500-1,700. The procedure may be pricey for some, but when you consider the risks and cost points of other procedures like face-lift surgery and chemical facial treatments, vampire facials may be the treatment that’s worth your while.
But, you know what wasn’t disappointing? The day-three results. While the hours immediately following the hour-long appointment were characterized by an unsightly red, ultra-puffy complexion (which was really just exacerbated by the fact that I have sensitive skin), with the help of an even layer of Alastin Regenerating Skin Nectar (the post-treatment product Dr. Peredo told me to use for the next week), by day two it looked like I had a low-key sunburn and day three my skin looked radiant and refreshed. 
The next generation PRP is here at FACE! It’s called Selphyl® PRFM (Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix) and it is the most advanced Stem Cell and plasma facial to help aging, scarring, skin tone and texture. FACE has taken this a step further to launch its Stem Cell DIVA™ to incorporate oxygenation and phototherapy, and PRP Stem Cell VIVA™ using fractional RF for even greater rejuvenation and tightening. FACE is the first in the world to bring these advances together. A celebrity favorite to beautiful skin without the downtime!

When you hear the name vampire facelift, it can make you think of a lot of different things. Pale skin, long fangs, Brad Pitt… However, it’s a great alternative to an actual, surgical facelift. What makes the vampire facelift even more enticing, is that this kind of facelift doesn’t use any artificial products, thus making it a much safer choice. That’s reassuring to hear since it’s going into your own body. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to brighten up your face a little bit, and with a vampire facelift, you can do this pretty quickly, with few side effects and a short recovery time.

“Thanks to modern science, we now know that platelets contain various factors that stimulate the production of collagen, elastic fibers and new blood vessels,” says Mandeville. “Microneedling causes direct trauma to the skin. As a result, the body rushes to repair the wounds, sending platelets and cells to the rescue. As platelets play a significant role in terms of growth factors, it seems particularly appealing to inject the plasma back into the skin through the punctured holes to really speed up the healing of the tissues.”
But simply getting facial injections of dermal filler and PRP does not mean it's a Vampire Facelift. The true "Vampire Facelift" was designed and trademarked Dr. Charles Runels of Alabama. In order to use the vampire term in connection with a facial PRP injectable procedure, professionals must pay for Runels' special training, and use his specific techniques and HA fillers.
The evidence isn’t clear for either of those assumptions in this case. PRP has been studied in a variety of medical settings to assist with healing, but evidence that shows it helps with skin rejuvenation are still relatively new. Dermatologists do seem to agree that PRP can improve pores, acne scars, and fine lines, which have caused vampire facials to become very popular, especially at med spas like the one in New Mexico.
In general, the average cost of vampire facelift is around USD1000 to USD1500, depending on a number of factors. One of the most important is the geography location of the clinic where the treatment is being conducted. In expensive cities such as New York City, Miami etc, the prices of vampire face lift tend to be higher than places such as Houston or Dallas.

Reflections prides itself in providing patients with meaningful, natural-looking results using cutting-edge treatments and technologies. That often means combining several treatment techniques and/or technologies to achieve the best possible results. In the case of the Vampire Facelift, that combination is Botox, Dermal Fillers, and Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP). The name is a play on combining a Vampire Facial with a Liquid Facelift.
So, what is it and how does it work, exactly? Don't let the name fool you. In fact, "It's usually done in full light of day," says Beverly Hills-based dermatologist Ava Shamban. In all seriousness, the treatment is a "combination of a microdermabrasion, followed by the application of PRP (platelet-rich plasma)," says Shamban. "The PRP is derived from the serum portion of the blood, which contains platelets. The platelets contain high levels of growth factors, which, when applied to the skin, will stimulate cell turnover."
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