The best way to consider The Vampire Facelift® is with a personal consultation with Oculoplastic surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad. You can contact our offices in Manhattan at (212) 265-8877, or at Garden City, Long Island at (516) 742-4636. Someone is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can also fill out the contact form below and we will get back to you.

The procedure has been around for several years, but became more widely available after Kim Kardashian posted a blood-slathered selfie on Instagram in 2013, after filming the procedure for an episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians spin-off Kourtney & Kim Take Miami. Earlier this year, Kardashian reflected on the experience in a post on her blog; the text is only available to paid subscribers, but honestly, the bloody photo, headline (“The Skincare Treatment I’ll Never Do Again”) and caption (“So Not Worth It!”) – not to mention the mysterious infection in Albuquerque – just about sums it up.
"[It's] a broad term that was originally coined by a provider in Southern California—it doesn’t really describe a specific treatment," Wilbur Hah from the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery told Newsweek. "Generally speaking, the term “vampire facial” is used to describe platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy, with most physicians performing a microneedling treatment with PRP to both trigger the body’s natural healing response and provide the skin with regenerative growth factors."
In general, you’ll want to increase your water consumption for a day or two prior to the appointment. This helps increase the volume of blood in your body, making the PRP process much easier. You’ll also want to avoid blood thinners, if at all possible, for up to two weeks prior to appointment. These include over-the-counter pain medications and vitamins. Do not stop prescription medication blood thinners without first consulting with the doctor who prescribed them to you.
When I arrived at Skinfluence, I was met by Dr. Peredo and her nurse, Joanne Shellock, LPN. As I settled into the dentist-like chair (something I wasn’t totally fond of, given my hatred of the dentist office, though not dentists as a whole), they began giving me the rundown of what was about to happen. As they rolled up my sleeves to check my veins for blood draw, they told me, once again, just how beneficial this treatment can be for women of all ages. They pointed out, though, that at the ripe age of 25, with few wrinkles in sight, I may not see the same jaw-dropping results as my more mature counterparts. Regardless, I was ready to see what this vampire facial was all about. 
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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