The ’prp therapy’ or the platelet rich plasma therapy,worked wonders for me and my best friend. Since we were both a little scarred to go for it alone, we decide to visit a dermatology clinic together. It kind of sounded more scary than it actually was when we did it. And after that we both went for coffee, like it wasn’t a big deal at all. We tan a lot, and we were both experiencing dry skin, and some sun damage, although we do really care for our skin. The treatment lasted for 45 minutes in my case, and my friend was in there for an hour. We went out looking fresh, and no pain at all. It was a weird sensation, but nothing bad. After a couple of more treatments, we both noticed a great improvement, not just in removing the sun damaged areas but tightening our face. It was just like natural face lift, with no surgery or anything. It’s awesome!
A Vampire Facelift is performed by injecting a filler (such as hyaluronic acid, Juvederm or Restylane) into areas of the face that need a “boost” and then injecting the PRP. You’ll get the benefits of the filler adding volume and shape as well as the growth factors that help the body generate new, younger tissue. Essentially the skin is “fertilized” from the inside out. You’ll see a reduction in fine lines and an increase in volume but also improved tone, color and texture. The Vampire Facelift is an excellent solution for patients who have facial volume loss that occurs after weight loss or due to aging.
The evidence isn’t clear for either of those assumptions in this case. PRP has been studied in a variety of medical settings to assist with healing, but evidence that shows it helps with skin rejuvenation are still relatively new. Dermatologists do seem to agree that PRP can improve pores, acne scars, and fine lines, which have caused vampire facials to become very popular, especially at med spas like the one in New Mexico.
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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