hi this is alison annable, r.e.—- vampire facelift, ….. what did you actually think about the vampire facelift, i found it to be absolutely amazing, @ the comments i have had is unbelievable, people saying how much younger i look, @ how nice my skin looks, ….. what are your views about the vampire?,,, could you get back to me, with a comment, thankyouuuuuuu x
When it comes to weird and outrageous skin care, I’m the first to sign up. Not only is testing new products and treatments part of my job as a beauty editor, I truly enjoy it. Skin care is my jam! So, when vampire facials became popular (thanks to Kim Kardashian West), I was immediately intrigued. First of all, I love a spa treatment, but a kind of facial that sounds like something Elvira would get? I would come running as fast as I could. I am a goth at heart, after all. So, when the cosmetic procedure website RealSelf invited me to try a vampire facial, I was more than down to do it. But, it wasn’t until later I realized what a vampire facial would actually entail. My actual blood being procured from my body and going back into my face?! What in the name of Sarah Michelle Gellar did I get myself into?
Reflections prides itself in providing patients with meaningful, natural-looking results using cutting-edge treatments and technologies. That often means combining several treatment techniques and/or technologies to achieve the best possible results. In the case of the Vampire Facelift, that combination is Botox, Dermal Fillers, and Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP). The name is a play on combining a Vampire Facial with a Liquid Facelift.

The New Mexico Department of Health has since shut down the spa and is urging any of its clients who received a vampire facial or other injection-based treatments in May or June of this year to get tested for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C for free at the Midtown Public Health Office. The statement does not mention which of these infections the client contracted, nor which specific treatment the individual had received.


Later that night my skin was pretty red but when I woke up the next morning most of the redness had disappeared. It takes four to six weeks to see the treatment’s full results (collagen takes a bit of time to grow), but I can assure you that I saw benefits almost immediately. I’ve had a fair share of facials that left me wondering if the treatment worked or if my skin was just having a good couple of weeks. Trust me — you will never once question whether or not this treatment is effective.
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While I didn’t have many wrinkles, dark spots, or acne scars originally, to really show the magical effects of this treatment, the fact that a cystic period pimple was able to RIP in just three days when it usually takes seven-plus was reason enough for me to believe in this star-studded skin-care fave. So much so that I’ll be returning to Skinfluence in just a few weeks for round two. 
The procedure has been around for several years, but became more widely available after Kim Kardashian posted a blood-slathered selfie on Instagram in 2013, after filming the procedure for an episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians spin-off Kourtney & Kim Take Miami. Earlier this year, Kardashian reflected on the experience in a post on her blog; the text is only available to paid subscribers, but honestly, the bloody photo, headline (“The Skincare Treatment I’ll Never Do Again”) and caption (“So Not Worth It!”) – not to mention the mysterious infection in Albuquerque – just about sums it up.
Once the treatment is complete, Chang applies a soothing cream that contains stem cells and then sunscreen to the patient’s face. She compares the treatment to a chemical peel or a laser in terms of inducing local trauma to boost collagen. To further accelerate the healing process for patients, Chang often uses an LED light. For about 20 minutes post-procedure, patients remain on the treatment table under a tri-paneled lamp. Infrared light is known to accelerate skin recovery and red light is known to reduce inflammation.

If you’ve recently visited the Albuquerque spa in question and feel that you may not have received the most sanitary treatment, please contact us. We are offering free HIV and Hepatitis testing to anyone who underwent a treatment at that spa and is worried about their status. We believe your spa time shouldn’t be met with potential HIV exposure – talk about the opposite of relaxing!

In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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