A. Exclusive to FACE, the PRP Stem Cell VIVA™ uses fractional radiofrequency with PRFM to cause collagen contraction, for more therapeutic rejuvenation resulting in firming of the skin, and overall more dramatic results. Great for individuals with more photo-aged skin. The PRP Stem Cell DIVA™ combines the Stem Cell Facial with PPFM with therapeutic oxygen and broad spectrum light therapy to stimulate collagen and elastin more and plump up the skin for that untouchable red carpet glow.

Reflections prides itself in providing patients with meaningful, natural-looking results using cutting-edge treatments and technologies. That often means combining several treatment techniques and/or technologies to achieve the best possible results. In the case of the Vampire Facelift, that combination is Botox, Dermal Fillers, and Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP). The name is a play on combining a Vampire Facial with a Liquid Facelift.

The Vampire Facelift is considered a medical treatment in all states. Consult with patients about their medical history and conduct a brief physical exam to accept them for treatment. The exam should be performed by a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner. Only doctors and licensed medical professionals can draw blood and make injections, but trained medical spa employees can apply surface PRP without needles or micro-needling devices. Talk to your state medical board or health care attorney to learn more about the rules in your state.
Dr. Peredo explained that a vampire facial, also known as a blood facial or PRP facial, involves extracting blood from a patient’s arm and using a centrifuge to separate the platelets and plasma from the red blood cells. From there, Dermapen, microneedling, infuses skin with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that stimulates collagen and elastin fibers to promote cell turnover for your most brilliant complexion through a series of thousands of tiny pinpricks. Okay, so no wonder Kim looked terribly in pain. But anything in the name of beauty, right?
Thank you for your question. PRP is a very safe and effective facial rejuvenation procedure. You should ensure that you get the procedure done from a qualified and experienced cosmetic plastic surgeon, as the areas around the eyes is very delicate. It may improve dark circles to an extent. Usually three sessions are required. The cost will vary depending on the country. READ MORE
"Platelet-rich plasma therapy, particularly when combined with other anti-aging treatments like microneedling, can help soften the appearance of common signs of aging, such as fine lines and loss of skin tone," he said. "Because it enhances your natural collagen production, it can also firm and smooth the skin for a more youthful complexion and reduce sun damage and scarring."
The Vampire Facial ® is protected by US Patent & Trademark Law. Only providers listed on this site are members of the Vampire Facial Provider Group, know the trade secrets of  the Vampire Facial®, have agreed to use FDA approved equipment, and own license to use the "Vampire" name.  Any others using the name "Vampire Facial" (or any variation) are not members of the group, are violating trademark/patent law, may be doing an inferior  (even dangerous) procedure, and are subject to prosecution.

An Albuquerque, New Mexico, spa was served with a cease-and-desist letter and was forced to close this month because it may have exposed a client to an infection. The culprit? “Vampire facials,” a trendy skin care treatment that involves drawing blood from a client’s body, placing it in a centrifuge, then reapplying it to the face, supposedly to promote cell renewal.
Reflections prides itself in providing patients with meaningful, natural-looking results using cutting-edge treatments and technologies. That often means combining several treatment techniques and/or technologies to achieve the best possible results. In the case of the Vampire Facelift, that combination is Botox, Dermal Fillers, and Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP). The name is a play on combining a Vampire Facial with a Liquid Facelift.
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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