The Vampire FactLift™ procedure lasts about 30 minutes.  Blood is drawn from the patient’s arm.  The blood is placed in a centrifuge where it is processed to isolate the platelets from the red blood cells and other blood components.  The blood is then treated, most commonly with calcium chloride.  This process releases the PRFM (platelet rich fibrin matrix), growth-rich platelets.
"While it has become incredibly popular and can yield wonderful results, it is not necessarily the miracle treatment some advertise it as," Hah said. "That being said, PRP has been used for last two decades to help treat musculoskeletal pain and regenerate cells; it is not a new “fad” treatment. In fact, studies have shown that PRP effectively promotes tissue remodeling in aging skin."

When you hear the name vampire facelift, it can make you think of a lot of different things. Pale skin, long fangs, Brad Pitt… However, it’s a great alternative to an actual, surgical facelift. What makes the vampire facelift even more enticing, is that this kind of facelift doesn’t use any artificial products, thus making it a much safer choice. That’s reassuring to hear since it’s going into your own body. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to brighten up your face a little bit, and with a vampire facelift, you can do this pretty quickly, with few side effects and a short recovery time.


No, a Vampire Facial mixes PRP with Microneedling to address skin texture and thickness. It doesn’t offer the lifted result that a Vampire Facelift does, and it doesn’t address wrinkles. Typically, Vampire Facials are more of a preventative treatment used by younger patients who want to build collagen actively before it starts to diminish with age, or for those who are looking to improve mild acne scarring without the downtime of a laser.
Vampire facials aren’t all that new, but you can pretty much narrow down their popularity in the past few years to one woman: Kim Kardashian. In 2013, she Instagrammed a rather shocking photo of her blood-soaked face as a way to promote that night’s episode of Kourtney & Kim Take Miami (RIP), leading to a barrage of news outlets to ask, “Uh, what’s the deal with this weird new skin care thing?”
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
© 2018 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18) and Your California Privacy Rights. Allure may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
The best way to consider The Vampire Facelift® is with a personal consultation with Oculoplastic surgeon Dr. Amiya Prasad. You can contact our offices in Manhattan at (212) 265-8877, or at Garden City, Long Island at (516) 742-4636. Someone is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can also fill out the contact form below and we will get back to you.
If you’ve ever wanted a facelift but were too afraid to go under the knife, a vampire facelift can be a great solution for you. And no, it’s not as scary as it sounds! For example, does your face look a little tired and your skin a little dull? Maybe you just want your face to look younger and more refreshed. Would you like to try something a little unconventional to help you deal with these problems? Well, a Vampire Facelift is a non-surgical facelift in which a mixture of natural fillers and plasma from the patient’s own blood is injected into specific areas of the patient’s face. It smoothes out lines and wrinkles in your face, using only natural products from your own body. The vampire facelift is a relatively new procedure and is very popular with celebrities. This kind of procedure is used by people who don’t want to use lasers and would prefer a more natural approach. So now you’re probably asking yourself, how does this work? Are any vampires involved in the vampire facelift? Will I live forever and have to sleep in a coffin? Does the Vampire Facelift really work? Are there any side effects associated with the Vampire Facelift? How long does it take to see a result?
A "blood facial" or "vampire facial" is a cosmetic procedure during which a doctor draws a couple vials of blood from your arm, centrifuges the blood to separate out the plasma and platelets from the red blood cells, and then adds the platelet-rich plasma back into your face. For extra absorption, the doctor pokes your face all over with a bunch of micro-needles before applying the plasma. Reminds me a little bit of making a Jell-O poke cake.
The day leading up to my appointment, my best friend continually cringed at the idea of my soon-to-be bloody face while my mom made sure to text me every five minutes asking if this is really something I wanted to go through with, having sensitive skin and all. While their concerns pushed me to the point of advising my editor that I may need to work from home the next day if I look busted AF (since bruising and redness are possible short-term results), I stuck to my appointment and headed to the Upper East Side to arrive early for a treatment that, at the very best, could change the way I view my complexion, and, at the very worst, put me out of commission for a couple of days. 
With my face completely numb and my platelet-rich plasma ready to go, I hopped onto the table. From there Rhiannon and I discussed the microneedling I had been bracing for. She explained that she would adjust the pen to penetrate my skin anywhere from .5 mm to 2 mm deep depending on the area of my face. On parts with less fat, like my forehead and around my nose, the pen would go just .5 mm deep. On the rest of my face she would bump it up to 1 mm. Once all of those details were squared away I felt confident to start the treatment. Bring it on!
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.

Your best bet is to schedule a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has experience with all facial rejuvenation techniques and technologies. Due to the large number of doctors promoting themselves as qualified cosmetic surgeons, choosing a surgeon can be a challenge. To make this task easier, Consumer Guide to Plastic Surgery has created a directory that exclusively lists surgeons who are board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS). Certification by the ABPS is widely accepted as the highest level of certification possible for plastic surgeons in the United States. Choosing one of these doctors guarantees you will be treated by a surgeon who has undergone extensive education, training and testing and is in excellent standing among his or her peers in the medical field.
The fun part was scaring my friends with my photos. The not-so-fun part was that I couldn’t wear makeup, which was tough, especially because my skin was still beet red for two days after the procedure. I just wanted to dip my entire head in concealer. I had to stay out of the sun, so when I went on a picnic with my BFF, I made sure to keep my face covered with two parasols. So goth!
I wasn’t able to do my usual skin care regimen for a few days after the facial. I had to use a gentle face wash (I used Sonya Dakar Sensi Face Wash) and a hydrating moisturizer — nothing too thick — so I used Tatcha The Water Cream. My skin was insanely red, even after washing the blood off. However, that didn’t stop me from going to Eataly that night and indulging in some carbs. I deserved it, quite frankly.
Your best bet is to schedule a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has experience with all facial rejuvenation techniques and technologies. Due to the large number of doctors promoting themselves as qualified cosmetic surgeons, choosing a surgeon can be a challenge. To make this task easier, Consumer Guide to Plastic Surgery has created a directory that exclusively lists surgeons who are board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS). Certification by the ABPS is widely accepted as the highest level of certification possible for plastic surgeons in the United States. Choosing one of these doctors guarantees you will be treated by a surgeon who has undergone extensive education, training and testing and is in excellent standing among his or her peers in the medical field.
Do not take BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
Your surgeon draws blood from your arm (not your neck, as many a movie vampire has been known to do) and spins it to separate out the plasma, which contains platelets. These are the proteins and growth factors that may stimulate collagen production and thereby promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation. There are several kits available to isolate these growth factors, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Once collected, the PRP is injected back into your face.
If the procedure is carried out properly, the risks are low, except for people with blood-related medical issues, especially those which require blood-thinning medication. The microneedling causes temporary bleeding—hence the name "Vampire facial". Meanwhile, bruising, swelling, redness and pain may persist over the injection site, but these side effects usually disappear within a few days.
The before and after photos look convincing but I am still skeptical as I have tried lots of cosmetic procedures that promise the world and end up doing very little to improve the face. Given the $1500 price tag I would say you are quite possibly much better of buying a course of laser treatments instead. The Vampire Facelift procedure just seems a tiny bit primitive in my opinion.
That’s why it’s imperative that when you receive treatment (whether medical or for physical changes), you ensure that the needles used are either new or were properly sanitized. Before beginning a procedure, be sure to ask about their sanitizing procedures. Ask if you can watch them open a new needle or sanitize a used one. If they don’t use disposable needles, ask to watch the needle undergo its sanitization, and check that their sanitizer has been recently inspected. This may feel awkward at the time, but a true professional will understand your concern and the risks that are involved.
The vampire facial involves injecting part of the patient’s own blood directly into the face. Key to the treatment is platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the yellow-colored portion of blood that remains after red and white blood cells and other components have been removed. PRP helps blood clot and contains proteins that support cell growth. By stimulating collagen production, PRP helps rejuvenate aging skin by giving it more elasticity.
In general, the average cost of vampire facelift is around USD1000 to USD1500, depending on a number of factors. One of the most important is the geography location of the clinic where the treatment is being conducted. In expensive cities such as New York City, Miami etc, the prices of vampire face lift tend to be higher than places such as Houston or Dallas.
The Vampire Facial ® is protected by US Patent & Trademark Law. Only providers listed on this site are members of the Vampire Facial Provider Group, know the trade secrets of  the Vampire Facial®, have agreed to use FDA approved equipment, and own license to use the "Vampire" name.  Any others using the name "Vampire Facial" (or any variation) are not members of the group, are violating trademark/patent law, may be doing an inferior  (even dangerous) procedure, and are subject to prosecution.
×