I have heard so much talk about vampire facials that I decided to look into getting one for myself. While I have yet to do this procedure, I can tell you that it sounds like it will yield good results. I have looked at others have had the procedure done, and am excited with what I have seen. The before and after results of the vampire facial appear to be pretty impressive to me. I guess it sort of intrigues me that my own blood will be used to make my face look better.
Going in for a vampire facial, only to see a few drops of blood on the apples of my cheeks, the area surrounding my nostrils, and where the Dermapen abruptly burst a particularly stubborn period pimple on my chin, was disappointing. Not that I’m a super-gory human, but I love me some My Favorite Murder and the idea of going under the pen to come out equally as bloody (and beautiful) as her royal Kim-ness. 
The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.
“Thanks to modern science, we now know that platelets contain various factors that stimulate the production of collagen, elastic fibers and new blood vessels,” says Mandeville. “Microneedling causes direct trauma to the skin. As a result, the body rushes to repair the wounds, sending platelets and cells to the rescue. As platelets play a significant role in terms of growth factors, it seems particularly appealing to inject the plasma back into the skin through the punctured holes to really speed up the healing of the tissues.”
Dr. Peredo explained that a vampire facial, also known as a blood facial or PRP facial, involves extracting blood from a patient’s arm and using a centrifuge to separate the platelets and plasma from the red blood cells. From there, Dermapen, microneedling, infuses skin with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that stimulates collagen and elastin fibers to promote cell turnover for your most brilliant complexion through a series of thousands of tiny pinpricks. Okay, so no wonder Kim looked terribly in pain. But anything in the name of beauty, right?
I don’t think you and I had the same procedure then.. this was definitely painful and I’m someone w a high tolerance. I got the procedure done yesterday and there is NO WAY I could have gone out to dinner..I looked like I was an alien from a bad movie. I still pretty much look like that today. From the ways things are going, I think I’ve got another day or two. I was told that would be the case, and that’s how I planned for it. That’s why I’m writing here…maybe your procedure wasn’t as intense. There are different levels of intensity. And they use different levels of intensity on different areas of your face depending on what is needed. So far, I am so happy with it I could jump up and down on the bed and sing a song.
PRP is a concentrated source of platelets, growth factors and cytokines produced naturally in your own body, and stimulates and controls healthy regenerative processes, including collagen and soft tissue remodeling, and thereby improves overall health and rejuvenation. PRP has been used successfully for years to promote improved healing times and optimal results from various surgical and non-surgical procedures. The PRP, painlessly obtained through a small blood draw, is injected after dermal filler and enhances the results of this amazing procedure.

Platelets, Zeichner explains, are rich in growth factors, which essentially act as energy boots for our skin. This helps our skin function optimally, increasing everything from collagen to elastin, while also bringing antioxidant and hydrating properties. "Platelet-rich plasma is now commonly used topically as part of a regular facial, used along with microneedling to enhance penetration into the skin, and is even being injected into the skin in the same manner as dermal fillers," says Zeichner.
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