The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.
If you wonder whether or not a Vampire FaceLift is right for you, our care specialists are here to help. There are a variety of treatments available for the treatment of aging in the face and neck, and even if the PRP treatment is not for you, we can find a suitable alternative. We can discuss your needs, problem areas, and desired outcome in order to come up with a treatment plan that works best for you.
My husband and I have had an excellent experience every time we have been in the office. It’s worth the 65 mile drive for us! We could get all the services we receive across the street from our busi…ness, but we love the personalized experience and the expertise we receive at Dallas Anti Aging. We have been to many hormonal “experts” in the past, only to find they do not have the education and experience dealing with unique hormonal problems. We were looking for something other than the “one size fits all” approach to hormones, Dallas Anit Aging is definitely the place. The staff is incredibly gracious and attentive. I can’t name specific names because they are all so amazing and friendly, I would not want to leave anyone out. It’s refreshing to finally receive the answers I have been looking for, I wish we would have found Dallas Anti Aging sooner, but we are certainly blessed to have them now! more »
The main differentiator of the Vampire Facial is that instead of injecting the patient’s PRP in to the face, you use microneedling device, such as the Dermapen, to create microscopic pinpoint injuries to the face and then apply the PRP directly onto the surface of the skin. This process was famously used on reality TV star Kim Kardashian and went viral in 2014.
In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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