Some dermatologists I talked with did offer plasma injections, but not exactly in the way Kardashian got hers. Anthony Sclafani, a facial plastic surgeon at the New York Ear and Eye Infirmary, performs single-needle injections for wrinkles and acne scars. Sclafani also authored one of the only actual studies about platelet-rich plasma for wrinkles, a small study of 15 people published last year. The study was supported by Aesthetic Factors, the Pennsylvania-based company that makes the technology for separating plasma from the blood in the doctor's office, a procedure that previously had to be done in labs.

Earlier this week, the New Mexico Department of Health announced the closure of a spa in Albuquerque after one of their clients reportedly developed an “unspecified infection” sometime after getting a “vampire facial.” During an inspection of the facility on Friday morning, health department officials became concerned about the way the spa was managing the storage, handling and disposal of needles.

The next generation PRP is here at FACE! It’s called Selphyl® PRFM (Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix) and it is the most advanced Stem Cell and plasma facial to help aging, scarring, skin tone and texture. FACE has taken this a step further to launch its Stem Cell DIVA™ to incorporate oxygenation and phototherapy, and PRP Stem Cell VIVA™ using fractional RF for even greater rejuvenation and tightening. FACE is the first in the world to bring these advances together. A celebrity favorite to beautiful skin without the downtime!
This website does not contain medical advice and the use of this website does not create a physician/patient relationship between you and Booth Dermatology Group, P.C.. The photographs of models displayed on the headings and borders of this web site are for decorative purposes only. See before after photos of Booth Dermatology Group, P.C.'s patients for possible results.
I have done the vampire facelift after there was such a buzz about the Kim Kardashian facial. Lets face it....Kim is gorgeous. And I would not mind one bit looking like her. So after doing some careful research, I contacted my local cosmetic clinic and behold, they did offer this treatment. It was about $1100 but so well worth it. If I could post my before and after photos here, I would! I believe I truly look great now. The treatment was done just as described above. My treatment took about 45 to 50 minutes. I really do have fewer lines and wrinkles now, and I know that my face has a better tone to it. I also feel that I glow now, which I have never felt before. I would recommend this procedure if you can afford it. It really has given me some confidence and I think that it can do the same for you.
Runels is very serious about protecting the vampire name, emphasizing that he defined and named the procedure and does not want people being confused. He goes to great lengths to prevent "Vampire Facelift" from become a generic term for any procedure that uses PRP and makes it clear the procedure is not for everyone, including patients on blood thinners.
Key complications are reoperation, implant removal with or without replacement, implant rupture with silicone-filled implants, implant deflation with saline-filled implants, and severe capsular contracture (severe scar tissue around the implant). Other complications include asymmetry, nipple/breast/skin sensation changes, scarring, or wrinkling/rippling. Talk to your doctor about other complications.

The efficacy of PRFM is contested. As of March 2011, according to a New York Times report, it is attested by several plastic surgeons who use it but remains unproven by research.[1] Phil Haeck, the president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, dismissed the procedure as "creepy", "a gimmick" and as "antiquated as bloodletting".[1] It is marketed as Selphyl, TruPRP, Emcyte, Regen, and Pure Spin.

Also known as the Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP Facial), a vampire facial combines microneedling with application of Platelet-Rich Plasma. The procedure begins with drawing blood from the patient and then using a centrifuge to extract the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The patient then undergoes a microneedling treatment. The PRP is then applied to the skin during the treatment for deeper penetration and optimal results.


So my face was in a lot of discomfort to say the least and it was difficult to sleep the first night. There was minimal swelling when I left, but it seems with every hour my face is less and less recognizable! I called earlier in the day with concerns and I was told it was normal, I am starting not to believe so now. My eyes are almost swollen shut. I believe I am just having a bad reaction.
The Vampire Facial, on the other hand, is a type of skin resurfacing treatment (such as microneedling or microdermabrasion) which is followed by microneedling of PRP into the skin. The benefit of this method of treatment is that the tiny needles used with microneedling “trick” your body into thinking there is an injury, so new collagen is produced. Though the tiny needles may make the skin look red or irritated for a short while after treatment, it is well known to look much worse than it feels! The results are extremely beneficial for those with fine lines or those who have acne scars or other imperfections they would like to improve.
When I’m conducting my aesthetic PRP training in Beverly Hills & Nashville for doctors and clinic staff on how to perform PRP aesthetic procedures in the office or discussing the procedures with patients, one of the most frequent questions I hear is: “What’s the difference between the Vampire Facelift and the Vampire Facial?” They certainly sound similar, so the confusion isn’t surprising. Even though both of these trademarked procedures utilize PRP (platelet rich plasma), there is actually a significant difference in how they are completed and the results they provide.
Those who want to treat fine lines and slight sagging on the lower part of the face (like the chin) and to treat laxity in the décolleté area, as well as cleavage crepiness. It can also be used to treat acne scars and divots, cellulite, and even hair loss. Crow’s feet around the eye area can also be treated. “Selphyl is unique and distinct  – it’s the patient’s own regenerative potential in their blood re-injected back into the skin,” says Dr. Pearlman. “People who seek this [procedure] don’t want anything foreign injected [into their face] at all.” If you have any type of bleeding disorder or clotting problem, or if your platelets are low (thrombocytopenia), you may not be a candidate for this treatment.

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In laymen's terms: It's a facial that essentially uses, "your own blood to help promote the healthy activity of your skin cells," says Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Our blood is comprised of red blood cells and serum, which contain our white blood cells and platelets.
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