I was intrigued after delving into some research on the PRP (platelet-rich plasma) Growth Factor Facial. I actually started to come around to the idea of having tiny needles continuously plunged into my plasma-covered face. You see, the bloody facial featured on Keeping Up with the Kardashians is actually called the “Vampire Facelift™”. It is a trademarked procedure that is different from the one I would be receiving. The Kardashian-endorsed version involves filler injections. I was relieved to learn that Dr.Lorenc’s did not. A little Botox here and there is one thing, but a face full of fillers is another.
The Selphyl treatment is a gradual process, so don’t worry if you don’t see any immediate results – it can take four weeks for results to become apparent, with improvements seen around the six to 12 week mark. Most people report looking more refreshed and youthful, with a noticeable improvement in skin tone and texture. Overall, the results can last 12+ months.
The Selphyl treatment is a gradual process, so don’t worry if you don’t see any immediate results – it can take four weeks for results to become apparent, with improvements seen around the six to 12 week mark. Most people report looking more refreshed and youthful, with a noticeable improvement in skin tone and texture. Overall, the results can last 12+ months.
The vampire facelift takes approximately 30 to 40 minutes to perform. Before the procedure is performed, the surgeon needs to first draw blood from the patient (not with fangs, but with a syringe), then separate the platelets from the blood. The platelets and various natural fillers are then injected into the areas the patient has requested, such as the cheeks, mouth lines, under the eyes, etc. The vampire facelift costs anywhere between $800 to $1500, depending on where you have it done. If you have it done in a bigger city like San Francisco or New York, you’re going to pay a little more. As for recovery time, your face may be a little red afterwards, but it will go away in a few hours.

Chang begins the 90-minute procedure with a deep cleansing of the face and the application of numbing cream. During the numbing process, Chang draws blood from the patient’s arm and then places two vials of blood in a centrifuge for 10 minutes to isolate the PRP. Chang then removes the numbing cream from the patient’s face, applies some PRP to the face and then injects the plasma into the skin with a microneedling machine.

A. Using blood plasma to heal and regenerate the body originated from Orthopedics (FDA approved) and has numerous studies substantiating the regeneration and healing of injuries and tissue repair. PRP evolved from there for the purpose of skin rejuvenation. PRP means PLATELET RICH PLASMA, where the platelet concentration is generally considered to be double the normal concentration in whole blood. Red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) should be removed as much as possible from a PRP preparation. Some kits that tout high platelet concentrations often do so at the expense of having contaminating RBCs or WBCs – these cells are known to have inflammatory and catabolic effects – just the opposite of the desired effect. If the PRP in the syringe has any tinge of pink or red, it is mostly likely that you are injecting a preparation that has RBC contamination. The ideal PRP solution will be a golden, straw-like color.

Earlier this week, the New Mexico Department of Health announced the closure of a spa in Albuquerque after one of their clients reportedly developed an “unspecified infection” sometime after getting a “vampire facial.” During an inspection of the facility on Friday morning, health department officials became concerned about the way the spa was managing the storage, handling and disposal of needles.


But simply getting facial injections of dermal filler and PRP does not mean it's a Vampire Facelift. The true "Vampire Facelift" was designed and trademarked Dr. Charles Runels of Alabama. In order to use the vampire term in connection with a facial PRP injectable procedure, professionals must pay for Runels' special training, and use his specific techniques and HA fillers.
A facelift is a surgical procedure to reposition sagging cheeks and skin to improve the face, jawline and neck. Many people are hesitant to have surgery because of the risks of anesthesia and the healing process. Dr Prasad developed the Quick Recovery Facelift performed under local anesthesia with minimal intravenous sedation which allows patients to recover faster than a typical facelift performed under general anesthesia.

Sclafani is enthusiastic about the injections for certain patients. "It's been terrific," he says. "It's not for everybody," he continues, saying that some patients don't see any difference from the treatment. For those for whom it works, it appears to last a long time. Sometimes patients come back in six to eight months to get further treatments done, Sclafani says.

Dermal fillers add youthful volume to the face, while keeping a natural appearance. Hyaluronic acid fillers do not paralyze facial muscles like Botox, so volume is added without inhibiting facial movement or expressions. There is an art to the application of fillers for a natural and youthful appearance, and you can be confident that Dr. Prasad will apply his natural artistic abilities, technical skills and 20 years’ worth of experience to perform your procedure in the best possible way.
With incidents like the one at the Albuquerque spa making headlines, it is increasingly clear that there’s a need for more oversight and more standardization in the industry. Each state currently has different rules about how med spas can be run. Often, they don’t require a medical doctor to be on the premises, as long as one is available on call. These spas market themselves like salons but are actually offering potentially life-threatening procedures requiring knowledge of proper infection control practices.
Ever since Kim was seen walking into a spa with her BFF Jonathan Cheban to get the snap-worthy procedure, the world of influencers and everyday beauty lovers converged, making way for this crazy facial to be the topic of conversation and consideration IRL. And so I made an appointment to sit down with Dr. Marina Peredo at Skinfluence in New York City to get the 4-1-1 on all things bloody and beautiful. 
Reflections prides itself in providing patients with meaningful, natural-looking results using cutting-edge treatments and technologies. That often means combining several treatment techniques and/or technologies to achieve the best possible results. In the case of the Vampire Facelift, that combination is Botox, Dermal Fillers, and Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP). The name is a play on combining a Vampire Facial with a Liquid Facelift.
In case you don’t remember high school biology, “Platelets are the cells that circulate within our blood and bind together when they recognize damaged blood vessels,” says Dr. Marlene Williams of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. When the body is wounded, platelets come to the wound site and stick together to create a clot and stop bleeding. They also encourage the growth of new tissues. This new tissue growth is what scientists, doctors, and spas that use Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy are after.

Do not use LATISSE® if you are allergic to one of its ingredients. If you use/used prescription products for eye pressure problems, use LATISSE® under doctor care. May cause brown darkening of the colored part of the eye which is likely permanent. LATISSE® may cause eyelid skin darkening which may be reversible. Only apply at base of upper lashes. DO NOT APPLY to lower lid. Hair may grow outside the treatment area. If you have eye problems/surgery, consult your doctor. Common side effects include itchy and red eyes. If discontinued, lashes gradually return to previous appearance.
Most likely, says Shamban. Those with "premature wrinkles, high levels of solar damage, or anyone who wants an even tone and fresher appearance to their skin," is an ideal candidate for the procedure, she says. However, Zeichner warns that if you have a history of blood diseases, including clotting or bleeding disorders, you should not seek PRP treatment.
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