The Vampire Facial ® is protected by US Patent & Trademark Law. Only providers listed on this site are members of the Vampire Facial Provider Group, know the trade secrets of  the Vampire Facial®, have agreed to use FDA approved equipment, and own license to use the "Vampire" name.  Any others using the name "Vampire Facial" (or any variation) are not members of the group, are violating trademark/patent law, may be doing an inferior  (even dangerous) procedure, and are subject to prosecution.
Sclafani's injections are an off-label use of Selphyl, the Aesthetic Factors technology that separates plasma from the blood. Bruce Katz, another New York dermatologist who offers individual injections, uses a similar technology made by the Swiss company Regen Lab. Katz advertises "twilight plasma renewal treatment" on his website. His patients get about 20 injections at once in the face, neck and décolleté, he says.
The average cost of a platelet rich plasma therapy treatment for cosmetic purposes in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane is roughly  $1,000 – $1,500, but be warned not all PRP treatments are the same. Different clinics offer different grade of treatment some of which have little to no effect at all. Ensure the treatment is being performed by a Doctor or Nurse otherwise you might be getting a treatment that uses the same name but is totally different to what we are talking about here. True PRP/Vampire Facial and Vampire Facelift procedures must be performed by a Doctor or Nurse who is allowed to inject the plasma into the appropriate depths of the skin.
This procedure has garnered a lot of media attention because of its popularity with movie stars and celebrities and its sensational nickname. Patients come to the Advanced Dermatology clinic having heard about this treatment in the media. They are intrigued by its touted ability to refresh skin and erase wrinkles. They also arrive with many questions, muddled facts and misinformation they heard ‘somewhere’ or from ‘someone’.
PRPs are one of the latest trends in beauty and skincare because of its ability to stimulate new cellular growth, purportedly improving skin tone and texture, smoothing fine lines and even promoting hair growth. Patients are advised to pop a pain pill or to apply numbing cream to diminish any pain from the initial blood draw, as well as the microneedling method.
In case you don’t remember high school biology, “Platelets are the cells that circulate within our blood and bind together when they recognize damaged blood vessels,” says Dr. Marlene Williams of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. When the body is wounded, platelets come to the wound site and stick together to create a clot and stop bleeding. They also encourage the growth of new tissues. This new tissue growth is what scientists, doctors, and spas that use Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy are after.

The basic PRP treatment has been used for almost 20 years to accelerate the healing of wounds and burnt skin, and help athletes - including, reportedly, tennis ace Rafael Nadal - recover from injury. But it was when Dr Charles Runels from Alabama trademarked the name "Vampire Facelift" in 2010, during the craze for the Vampire Diaries and Twilight Saga, that the procedure became attractive for A-listers.
The New Mexico Department of Health announced this week that that a client of VIP Spa developed an undisclosed infection that may have come from having a vampire facial treatment done at the spa. The organization is urging people who got any "injection related service, including a vampire facial," to get tested for hepatitis B and C along with HIV. (The clinic has been shut down, BTW.)
"[It's] a broad term that was originally coined by a provider in Southern California—it doesn’t really describe a specific treatment," Wilbur Hah from the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery told Newsweek. "Generally speaking, the term “vampire facial” is used to describe platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy, with most physicians performing a microneedling treatment with PRP to both trigger the body’s natural healing response and provide the skin with regenerative growth factors."
Ok.. All I read is woman having vampire facelifts and PRP therapy but can guys have this procedure as well? I take care of myself and my skin, I use good skincare. Ive had botox done before but that is all in terms of cosmetic treatments. I have been reading a lot about this treatment but how much is a vampire facial, googled the vampire facial before and after photos and am really keen on giving it a try.

An Albuquerque, New Mexico, spa was served with a cease-and-desist letter and was forced to close this month because it may have exposed a client to an infection. The culprit? “Vampire facials,” a trendy skin care treatment that involves drawing blood from a client’s body, placing it in a centrifuge, then reapplying it to the face, supposedly to promote cell renewal.
With incidents like the one at the Albuquerque spa making headlines, it is increasingly clear that there’s a need for more oversight and more standardization in the industry. Each state currently has different rules about how med spas can be run. Often, they don’t require a medical doctor to be on the premises, as long as one is available on call. These spas market themselves like salons but are actually offering potentially life-threatening procedures requiring knowledge of proper infection control practices.
Thread Lifts offer instant lifting results without the added volume of dermal fillers. PRP can be added on to a Thread Lift to offer skin tone improvement, if desired. Some patients don’t have as much volume loss but still have moderate sagging, in which case a thread lift will create a more natural result. This is approximately the same price range for the same treatment areas, but can be more expensive when the neck is also treated.
Most likely, says Shamban. Those with "premature wrinkles, high levels of solar damage, or anyone who wants an even tone and fresher appearance to their skin," is an ideal candidate for the procedure, she says. However, Zeichner warns that if you have a history of blood diseases, including clotting or bleeding disorders, you should not seek PRP treatment.
×