Yasemin is a staff writer at Live Science, writing about biology and neuroscience, among other science topics. Yasemin has a biomedical engineering bachelors from the University of Connecticut and a science communication graduate certificate from the University of California, Santa Cruz. When she's not writing, she's probably taking photos or sitting upside-down on her couch thinking about thinking and wondering if anyone else is thinking about thinking at the exact same time.

During a Vampire FaceLift®, the PRP is injected back into your face in a precise and defined manner. These injections can reduce fine lines and wrinkles and help brighten gaunt or ghoulish-looking skin. They may also help refresh and add volume to certain areas of the face, such as the under-eye hollows. In addition, many doctors are studying the use of PRP in wound healing.
Unlike other facial treatments, the Vampire FaceLift addresses many different signs of aging. Surgical face-lifts often fix sagging skin but do little to help with the loss of structure or natural plumpness. Fillers, on the other hand, can help treat unsightly wrinkles, but because treatment is so targeted it can result in a more visible, less natural effect.

Your doctor draws blood from your arm and spins it to separate out the plasma, which contains platelets. These are the proteins and growth factors that stimulate collagen production and thereby promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation. There are many kits available to isolate these growth factors, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Once collected, the platelet-rich plasma is injected back into your face.


Watch and wait: Growth factors contained in the plasma stimulate the release of the skin’s stem cells. The skin is being tricked into believing that it has been injured and must heal itself with new, fresh tissue. This somewhat sneaky process allows the skin to create new collagen, new blood vessels, and new cells. The results will not be immediate, so while you patiently wait a few weeks and even a few months, your skin will begin to transform itself.
The New Mexico Department of Health announced this week that that a client of VIP Spa developed an undisclosed infection that may have come from having a vampire facial treatment done at the spa. The organization is urging people who got any "injection related service, including a vampire facial," to get tested for hepatitis B and C along with HIV. (The clinic has been shut down, BTW.)
These platelets, when injected into certain areas of the face, can encourage blood flow, assist with the production of collagen, and activate multipotent stem cells already present in the skin. In time, this procedure will even stimulate the body to produce new skin cells, generating younger tissue and reducing the signs of aging throughout the treated area. This will promote healthy collagen production and restore vitality to the blood vessels and fatty tissues in the neck and face.
While your face will look red, swollen and bloody immediately after the treatment (it can last a few hours to up to three days after), the results (you’ll see glowing skin immediately but it can take a month or so for the full results, which last about three months, to surface) it provides for cellular rejuvenation are unparalleled because it shortens healing time and stimulates collagen. “Athletes have used it to heal sprains, and now dermatologists are using the technique for hair restoration,” says Dr. Cheung.
Using numbing cream and a very small needle (for almost no pain), the patient’s own growth factors are injected back into her face in a particular way. These growth factors then activate multipotent stem cells already in the skin which is tricking them into “thinking” there’s been an injury and new younger tissue is generated. The multipotent stem cells then develop into new collagen, new blood vessels, and new fatty tissue trying to “repair” the skin that was never injured!
“Selphyl is not a filler – it’s a truly regenerative treatment that involves harvesting the body’s own wound healing and regenerative growth factors to improve skin texture, as well as age-related changes like fine lines and laxity,” says Dr. Jennifer Pearlman, staff physician at Mount Sinai Hospital, menopause clinic and owner of PearlMD Rejuvenation, where the treatment is also offered.
The facialist can reintroduce this PRP serum into the client's skin in two ways: by direct injection or microneedling. (Many treatments include both methods.) A vibrating microneedling pen opens tiny holes in the skin so that once the plasma is smeared on the face, it penetrates deeply. To minimize discomfort, Dr. Arviv's team preps the client's skin for microneedling with a numbing cream.
PRP is the “magic” behind both the Vampire Facelift and the Vampire Facial. PRP stands for Platelet Rich Plasma and is a component of your own blood. It contains platelets including both stem cells and growth factors. PRP is obtained by drawing blood and then processing it in a centrifuge to separate these vital growth factors. Because the PRP is “spun out” from the blood, the concentration of the growth factors and stem cells is much higher than what is found in regular blood. Then, the PRP can be utilized in either an injection (for the Vampire Facelift) or as part of a microneedling procedure (for the Vampire Facial).
The New Mexico Department of Health announced this week that that a client of VIP Spa developed an undisclosed infection that may have come from having a vampire facial treatment done at the spa. The organization is urging people who got any "injection related service, including a vampire facial," to get tested for hepatitis B and C along with HIV. (The clinic has been shut down, BTW.)

Before receiving KYBELLA®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: Have had or plan to have surgery on your face, neck, or chin; have had cosmetic treatments on your face, neck, or chin; have had or have medical conditions in or near the neck area; have had or have trouble swallowing; have bleeding problems; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if KYBELLA® will harm your unborn baby); are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed (it is not known if KYBELLA® passes into your breast milk).
"Maybe there's still some blood in it," suggests Sclafani, who's done extensive research on the competing $1,500 Selphyl system. He also injects platelet-rich plasma for facial rejuvenation, but without mixing in the added fillers. It's a simple injection, much like getting Botox or Restalyne. "No needle is fun, but most people are able to do this without any anesthesia," he says. "They shouldn't scream in pain like that."

At Reflections, we know that you want to make smart investments that your future self will thank you for. That’s one of the biggest appeals of a Vampire Facelift – not only will you see results that last longer than having any one of these procedures on their own, but upkeep will be minimal, and for the results you’ll see, this is one of the most cost-effective treatment options.

I have a few questions about vampire facials. First off, do you have more than one done? So if I have one this summer and the results are not what I expect, can I go back at a later date and have another one done? Or is this just a one time thing? I also would like to know how soon can I expect to see results? And what is the downtime of having a vampire facial?
Ever since Kim was seen walking into a spa with her BFF Jonathan Cheban to get the snap-worthy procedure, the world of influencers and everyday beauty lovers converged, making way for this crazy facial to be the topic of conversation and consideration IRL. And so I made an appointment to sit down with Dr. Marina Peredo at Skinfluence in New York City to get the 4-1-1 on all things bloody and beautiful. 
Is there a clinic around Parramatta that does the vampire face lift? Is the blood facial kim kardashian did the vampire face lift or prp plasma facial or something else? I was reading online about it and have since been keen to get one myself. The prp plasma facial does have its advantages, but I must ask. Who says that injecting your own blood is going to get you great results? I mean, do the doctors first test your blood? I’m guessing you can’t just do it if you have some sort of a disease, or does it matter at all? And, one more thing. Do they use the same vampire injection on everyone?

These completely automatic and adjustable devices penetrate at the right speed and depth through the outer, superficial layer of the skin (the epidermis) into the slightly deeper layer (the dermis) just underneath. Nothing is injected; the procedure is really just the “needling” itself, which in turn stimulates the dermis to release certain special active biomolecules into the surrounding skin.

With incidents like the one at the Albuquerque spa making headlines, it is increasingly clear that there’s a need for more oversight and more standardization in the industry. Each state currently has different rules about how med spas can be run. Often, they don’t require a medical doctor to be on the premises, as long as one is available on call. These spas market themselves like salons but are actually offering potentially life-threatening procedures requiring knowledge of proper infection control practices.


This website does not contain medical advice and the use of this website does not create a physician/patient relationship between you and Booth Dermatology Group, P.C.. The photographs of models displayed on the headings and borders of this web site are for decorative purposes only. See before after photos of Booth Dermatology Group, P.C.'s patients for possible results.
That’s why it’s imperative that when you receive treatment (whether medical or for physical changes), you ensure that the needles used are either new or were properly sanitized. Before beginning a procedure, be sure to ask about their sanitizing procedures. Ask if you can watch them open a new needle or sanitize a used one. If they don’t use disposable needles, ask to watch the needle undergo its sanitization, and check that their sanitizer has been recently inspected. This may feel awkward at the time, but a true professional will understand your concern and the risks that are involved.
Vampire facials aren’t all that new, but you can pretty much narrow down their popularity in the past few years to one woman: Kim Kardashian. In 2013, she Instagrammed a rather shocking photo of her blood-soaked face as a way to promote that night’s episode of Kourtney & Kim Take Miami (RIP), leading to a barrage of news outlets to ask, “Uh, what’s the deal with this weird new skin care thing?”
×