The vampire facial was only supposed to sound scary. Sure, it involves extracting the patient's own blood, isolating the platelet-rich plasma by spinning it in a centrifuge and then re-injecting it into the face. But the results are touted to be rejuvenated, smooth and supple skin, not an HIV or hepatitis scare, as clients of the VIP Spa in Albuquerque, N.M., are now facing.
Many people coming to our practice choose the Vampire Facelift® because it’s a non-surgical procedure. The term “facelift” when used in the context of the “Vampire Facelift®” describes how volume placed artistically and strategically under the skin can “lift” the skin away from the bony structure creating a more youthful appearance. As people get older, the fat under the skin decreases making the person look more hollow.
Many people coming to our practice choose the Vampire Facelift® because it’s a non-surgical procedure. The term “facelift” when used in the context of the “Vampire Facelift®” describes how volume placed artistically and strategically under the skin can “lift” the skin away from the bony structure creating a more youthful appearance. As people get older, the fat under the skin decreases making the person look more hollow.
The main differentiator of the Vampire Facial is that instead of injecting the patient’s PRP in to the face, you use microneedling device, such as the Dermapen, to create microscopic pinpoint injuries to the face and then apply the PRP directly onto the surface of the skin. This process was famously used on reality TV star Kim Kardashian and went viral in 2014.
A. Using blood plasma to heal and regenerate the body originated from Orthopedics (FDA approved) and has numerous studies substantiating the regeneration and healing of injuries and tissue repair. PRP evolved from there for the purpose of skin rejuvenation. PRP means PLATELET RICH PLASMA, where the platelet concentration is generally considered to be double the normal concentration in whole blood. Red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) should be removed as much as possible from a PRP preparation. Some kits that tout high platelet concentrations often do so at the expense of having contaminating RBCs or WBCs – these cells are known to have inflammatory and catabolic effects – just the opposite of the desired effect. If the PRP in the syringe has any tinge of pink or red, it is mostly likely that you are injecting a preparation that has RBC contamination. The ideal PRP solution will be a golden, straw-like color.
This procedure has garnered a lot of media attention because of its popularity with movie stars and celebrities and its sensational nickname. Patients come to the Advanced Dermatology clinic having heard about this treatment in the media. They are intrigued by its touted ability to refresh skin and erase wrinkles. They also arrive with many questions, muddled facts and misinformation they heard ‘somewhere’ or from ‘someone’.
The Vampire Facial ® is protected by US Patent & Trademark Law. Only providers listed on this site are members of the Vampire Facial Provider Group, know the trade secrets of  the Vampire Facial®, have agreed to use FDA approved equipment, and own license to use the "Vampire" name.  Any others using the name "Vampire Facial" (or any variation) are not members of the group, are violating trademark/patent law, may be doing an inferior  (even dangerous) procedure, and are subject to prosecution.
Ever heard of the Platelet-Rich Plasma Facial? If not, maybe you’ve heard of its more Instagrammable moniker “The Vampire Facial.” And we know, we’re STDcheck, so you might be thinking this has to do with Twilight and erotic fan fiction, but it doesn’t. This treatment first came to public light in 2013 when Kim K famously posted a bloody selfie after undergoing the procedure. Since then, celebrities, bloggers, and civilians alike have praised the good name of the Vampire Facial, citing it as the source of their dewy skin and radiant complexion. But recently, the publicity surrounding this mythologically-named derma treatment has turned negative after a spa in Albuquerque, New Mexico urged its Vampire Facial patrons to get tested for HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C.

“Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is widely used in regenerative medicine because of its high concentrations of various growth factors and platelets,” says this research study from Japan. Platelets contain more than 30 different growth factors, and according to VampireFacial.com, the official site of Vampire Facials, “These growth factors activate multipotent stem cells already in the skin (tricking them into thinking there’s been an injury and new, younger tissue should [be] generated).”

I was intrigued after delving into some research on the PRP (platelet-rich plasma) Growth Factor Facial. I actually started to come around to the idea of having tiny needles continuously plunged into my plasma-covered face. You see, the bloody facial featured on Keeping Up with the Kardashians is actually called the “Vampire Facelift™”. It is a trademarked procedure that is different from the one I would be receiving. The Kardashian-endorsed version involves filler injections. I was relieved to learn that Dr.Lorenc’s did not. A little Botox here and there is one thing, but a face full of fillers is another.

The Vampire Facial has become popular thanks to celebrities having the procedure to keep their skin looking camera ready and glowing. The Vampire Facial is a procedure which combines platelet rich plasma (PRP) with the use of micro needle dermal stimulation (rejuvapen). The medical micro needle procedure using the Rejuvapen is a method of “collagen induction therapy” also referred to as “CIT”. The small entries into the dermis cause the skin to respond with collagen which softens the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles as well as superficial sun damage.
The before and after photos look convincing but I am still skeptical as I have tried lots of cosmetic procedures that promise the world and end up doing very little to improve the face. Given the $1500 price tag I would say you are quite possibly much better of buying a course of laser treatments instead. The Vampire Facelift procedure just seems a tiny bit primitive in my opinion.

While I didn’t have many wrinkles, dark spots, or acne scars originally, to really show the magical effects of this treatment, the fact that a cystic period pimple was able to RIP in just three days when it usually takes seven-plus was reason enough for me to believe in this star-studded skin-care fave. So much so that I’ll be returning to Skinfluence in just a few weeks for round two. 
I have a few questions about vampire facials. First off, do you have more than one done? So if I have one this summer and the results are not what I expect, can I go back at a later date and have another one done? Or is this just a one time thing? I also would like to know how soon can I expect to see results? And what is the downtime of having a vampire facial?
A facelift is a surgical procedure to reposition sagging cheeks and skin to improve the face, jawline and neck. Many people are hesitant to have surgery because of the risks of anesthesia and the healing process. Dr Prasad developed the Quick Recovery Facelift performed under local anesthesia with minimal intravenous sedation which allows patients to recover faster than a typical facelift performed under general anesthesia.
A vampire facial is a type of facial treatment that rejuvenates the face using via PRP, or platelet-rich plasma—a serum made from the client's own blood. Vials of withdrawn blood are spun in a centrifuge until it separates, isolating the red and white blood cells from the plasma, an amber serum rich in platelets. "If it's a little hazy, you might have some other stuff floating around [in it], and you can spin it again to maximize your serum," Dr. Arviv said.
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The fun part was scaring my friends with my photos. The not-so-fun part was that I couldn’t wear makeup, which was tough, especially because my skin was still beet red for two days after the procedure. I just wanted to dip my entire head in concealer. I had to stay out of the sun, so when I went on a picnic with my BFF, I made sure to keep my face covered with two parasols. So goth!
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