In general, you’ll want to increase your water consumption for a day or two prior to the appointment. This helps increase the volume of blood in your body, making the PRP process much easier. You’ll also want to avoid blood thinners, if at all possible, for up to two weeks prior to appointment. These include over-the-counter pain medications and vitamins. Do not stop prescription medication blood thinners without first consulting with the doctor who prescribed them to you.

While your face will look red, swollen and bloody immediately after the treatment (it can last a few hours to up to three days after), the results (you’ll see glowing skin immediately but it can take a month or so for the full results, which last about three months, to surface) it provides for cellular rejuvenation are unparalleled because it shortens healing time and stimulates collagen. “Athletes have used it to heal sprains, and now dermatologists are using the technique for hair restoration,” says Dr. Cheung.


There are many benefits to the vampire facelift, cosmetically and financially. For your face, this procedure is great because not only are you getting the benefits of a smoother and brighter face, but you are getting injected with only natural resources. Other types of filler procedures use artificial materials. Also, the vampire facelift is a lot less expensive than other, similar types of skin tightening procedures. As for safety, since you are only having natural things injected into your face, the vampire facelift is typically safe. There are no known side effects, and your body easily accommodates the filler because it’s made from your own blood. Also, there is a theory that using your own body tissues will cause your tissue to regenerate collagen. Although this has yet to be fully proven.
With incidents like the one at the Albuquerque spa making headlines, it is increasingly clear that there’s a need for more oversight and more standardization in the industry. Each state currently has different rules about how med spas can be run. Often, they don’t require a medical doctor to be on the premises, as long as one is available on call. These spas market themselves like salons but are actually offering potentially life-threatening procedures requiring knowledge of proper infection control practices.
The incisions are generally made in front of your ears, along the temple and continues around and behind the ear. This is to minimize noticeable scaring. After the operation is completed, small tubes will be inserted beneath the skin to drain away fluid that might otherwise accumulate. There is generally very little discomfort after the facelift surgery.
Coating and Soaking Your Face with Blood-Derived Growth FactorsOnce finished their may be some PRP serum that is sent home with the client. This should be refrigerated, but used as a facial serum throughout the remainder of the day or evening,.These growth factors then activate multipotent stem cells already in the skin (tricking them into “thinking” there’s been an injury and new younger tissue should be generated).
Step 3 is taking the isolated PRP created from the previous step and injecting it into strategic areas. Using a very small needle, you will be injected with your own growth factors in a particular way. These growth factors then activate multi-potent stem cells already in the skin, tricking them into “thinking” there’s been an injury and then generate newer, and younger tissue.
The most commonly reported side effects with JUVÉDERM® injectable gels included injection-site redness, swelling, pain, tenderness, firmness, lumps/bumps, bruising, discoloration, and itching. For JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA® XC, dryness was also reported. For JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC, most side effects were moderate and lasted 2 to 4 weeks. For JUVÉDERM® XC, JUVÉDERM VOLLURE™ XC, and JUVÉDERM® Ultra XC injectable gels, most side effects were mild or moderate and lasted 14 days or less. For JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA® XC, most side effects were mild or moderate and lasted 30 days or less.
Some of you hate this treatment so much. Really? It’s the best thing I’ve read about out there, medically speaking. Why do so many women have prejudice about something before they try it? Personally, I think the vampire facial is a great way, and a healthy way to rejuvenate your skin, and to feel fresh. It’s not like you’re really a vampire, and I get the impression in many vampire facial reviews that women consider it scary. I had it done, and I have great results and I am so thrilled I just want to spread the joy. Not because now I look great, but because more and more people need to try this! It’s really effective, the results are visible very fast. It’s not that painful either. None of you should really hate anything before you try it, but I guess that’s the old way of people and it’s never going to change. As far as I’m concerned the vampire facial is great!
The New Mexico Department of Health announced this week that that a client of VIP Spa developed an undisclosed infection that may have come from having a vampire facial treatment done at the spa. The organization is urging people who got any "injection related service, including a vampire facial," to get tested for hepatitis B and C along with HIV. (The clinic has been shut down, BTW.)

The statement doesn't mention which specific practices might have led to infections. But hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV can all be spread through contact with bodily fluids, including blood. The owner of VIP Spa is also encouraging clients to get tested, though she told local news station KOB 4 that she always used new needles during the treatments.

Ever heard of the Platelet-Rich Plasma Facial? If not, maybe you’ve heard of its more Instagrammable moniker “The Vampire Facial.” And we know, we’re STDcheck, so you might be thinking this has to do with Twilight and erotic fan fiction, but it doesn’t. This treatment first came to public light in 2013 when Kim K famously posted a bloody selfie after undergoing the procedure. Since then, celebrities, bloggers, and civilians alike have praised the good name of the Vampire Facial, citing it as the source of their dewy skin and radiant complexion. But recently, the publicity surrounding this mythologically-named derma treatment has turned negative after a spa in Albuquerque, New Mexico urged its Vampire Facial patrons to get tested for HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C.


I have a few questions about vampire facials. First off, do you have more than one done? So if I have one this summer and the results are not what I expect, can I go back at a later date and have another one done? Or is this just a one time thing? I also would like to know how soon can I expect to see results? And what is the downtime of having a vampire facial?
A facelift is a surgical procedure to reposition sagging cheeks and skin to improve the face, jawline and neck. Many people are hesitant to have surgery because of the risks of anesthesia and the healing process. Dr Prasad developed the Quick Recovery Facelift performed under local anesthesia with minimal intravenous sedation which allows patients to recover faster than a typical facelift performed under general anesthesia.
So, what is it and how does it work, exactly? Don't let the name fool you. In fact, "It's usually done in full light of day," says Beverly Hills-based dermatologist Ava Shamban. In all seriousness, the treatment is a "combination of a microdermabrasion, followed by the application of PRP (platelet-rich plasma)," says Shamban. "The PRP is derived from the serum portion of the blood, which contains platelets. The platelets contain high levels of growth factors, which, when applied to the skin, will stimulate cell turnover."
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